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In the scientific method, an experiment is an empirical method that arbitrates between competing models or hypotheses. Experimentation is also used to test existing theories or new hypotheses in order to support them or disprove them.
Take a look at the steps of the scientific method:
1. Make observations.
2. Formulate a hypothesis.
3. Design and conduct an experiment to test the hypothesis.
4. Evaluate the results and accept or reject the hypothesis.

STEP 1: Observations
#1 People who play computer games like games. This is mostly true, however some gamers who played these titles might disagree.
#2 People who buy computer games prefer spending less money to spending more money.
It hurts us a little bit, but the truth is games don't sell for $1000+
#3 GOG.com users are people who play, like, and buy computer games.

STEP 2: Hypothesis
If GOG.com lowers the prices of some games in our catalog, more gamers will be inclined to buy and enjoy those high-quality products.

STEP 3: The Experiment
We're trying out some new pricing, and we want to see what you guys think of it.

Prices changed from $5.99 to $3.99:
Alien Shooter, Celtic Kings, Commandos Ammo Pack, Constructor, Empire Earth, Knights and Merchants, Litil Divil, Lords of Magic, Lords of the Realm, Mobile Forces, Myst: Masterpiece Edition, Outcast, Personal Nightmare, Realms of Haunting, Rollercoaster Tycoon, Simon the Sorcerer, Waxworks.

Prices changed from $9.99 to $6.99:
Broken Sword 4: The Angel of Death, Ceville, Evil Genius, Haegemonia Gold Edition, King's Bounty, Moto Racer 3, Red Baron Pack, Restaurant Empire, Sanitarium, Shadowgrounds, Sherlock Holmes, The Incredible Machines, Warlords Battlecry 3

STEP 4: Results
This is where you, our dear gamers, step in and decide the results. We'd like to offer you the best games in history on PC & Mac for the most affordable prices, but we need to fund testing, coding, bundling, and securing rights to even more classics. So we want to see if this brings us and our partners more money overall, even though there's less per individual sale. That's the argument we'd like to make, but we'll see what the results from you guys actually are as we try out our new price points.
Good scientific projects needs to be supported, so I participated as well with:
King`s Bounty: Very fair price for really good game. This game is almost HOMAM-killer for me (just my sinful opinion).
Outcast: Best Steal Ever...er, I mean Best Deal Ever!

Thank You GOG! I hope The Experiment shall be sucessful.

Client: If completely optional, why not...but with the strongest emphasis that is possible on that "optional" word.
Loyalty discounts: Again, why not, but I can live without them as well.
I like that you do lower prices.
With that said:
Some of your prices are too high. If I can get the boxed cd edition of a game cheaper in my local supermarket (of all places !!eleven!) there is something going wrong. (Example: RollerCoasterTycoon 3, can get it for 10 bucks as a cd, so while your on sale price is usually alright, your regular price is not).

Also I would like to propose an additional experiment:
Aside from user ratings, rate the games yourself, in a truthful way. (Lot's of user ratings are way off, and I don't know what those people are smoking, but get me some of that.)
There are some horrible , horrible, truly horrible games on here (you know them!).
Some of them I can't even call a game without fighting the urge to barf.
So while there is still people who would buy them, a truthful review about the game from the guy(s)/company who is selling it, might help the user experience and more importantly the customer's trust (=good trust rating from customers = higher sales figures (?) ).

With that beeing said as well:
If you lower the price on garbage games, it's not going to help the experience much (example: restaurant empire, 6.99$, hell, even free is too much for that one).
Post edited March 25, 2013 by Boilais
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Boilais: I like that you do lower prices.
With that said:
Some of your prices are too high. If I can get the boxed cd edition of a game cheaper in my local supermarket (of all places !!eleven!) there is something going wrong. (Example: RollerCoasterTycoon 3, can get it for 10 bucks as a cd, so while your on sale price is usually alright, your regular price is not).
Truly just out of curiosity: Does the game in your local store include its 2 expansions too? if so, then yeah, the price here is bad, if it does not, then 20$ for basicly 3 games is not bad at all.
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Boilais: Also I would like to propose an additional experiment:
Aside from user ratings, rate the games yourself, in a truthful way. (Lot's of user ratings are way off, and I don't know what those people are smoking, but get me some of that.)
I don't think it would help GOG to get more publishers and games on board very much if their potential partners could look at the catalog and read "Oh yeah, this game we have released today is really shit, don't buy it."
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Boilais: I like that you do lower prices.
With that said:
Some of your prices are too high. If I can get the boxed cd edition of a game cheaper in my local supermarket (of all places !!eleven!) there is something going wrong. (Example: RollerCoasterTycoon 3, can get it for 10 bucks as a cd, so while your on sale price is usually alright, your regular price is not).

Also I would like to propose an additional experiment:
Aside from user ratings, rate the games yourself, in a truthful way. (Lot's of user ratings are way off, and I don't know what those people are smoking, but get me some of that.)
There are some horrible , horrible, truly horrible games on here (you know them!).
Some of them I can't even call a game without fighting the urge to barf.
So while there is still people who would buy them, a truthful review about the game from the guy(s)/company who is selling it, might help the user experience and more importantly the customer's trust (=good trust rating from customers = higher sales figures (?) ).

With that beeing said as well:
If you lower the price on garbage games, it's not going to help the experience much (example: restaurant empire, 6.99$, hell, even free is too much for that one).
I think if they rated the games 'themselves' then they might get accused, or even be guilty of bias, some kind of metacritic deal might work better but then that would only reflect how good they were at release, not how well they've aged...
I noticed that "Rollercoaster Tycoon" shot to the top of the "current best sellers" list when it was discounted on top of the experimentally reduced price. This demonstrates that the cheaper price point can indeed trigger a lot of sales. The question is, of course, whether that increased number of sales outweighs the reduced revenue per individual sale, and we don't have the data to determine that. But if a game becomes the current best seller in the shop, then I'll risk to guess that they do. :)
Just to toss a peanut from my gallery seat...

I don't think price always has that much to do with it. Most of the prices on GOG are fair, and if we want something now, we pay a fair price. For some of us, though, we have so many games nowadays that only a sale is likely to make us buy. For instance, I have 100+ games in my Steam library, and I'm currently working through some large classics like Baldur's Gate 1 & 2 (GOG) and Dungeon Siege 1 & 2 (Steam). It's going to be a long time before I need to buy another game, but sales can convince me to buy every now and then.

What I'm saying is this: if you lower your standard price, you may not get any additional sales from people like me, and people who were willing to pay the original fair price will now be paying you less. I think your experiment may end up demonstrating this.

That being said, I want to reiterate what I have said before in other places... if presented with a choice between GOG and Steam, I buy from GOG. Certain titles like Giana Sisters: Twisted Dreams will be eventually purchased by me, but only if it goes on sale or if I run out of games (in about 10 yrs). That doesn't say anything about GOG as much as it says about me and my games library, and I think there are an increasing number of people like me. Sales essentially convince me to pay now for something that I might eventually buy, and I'm not willing to pay 10+ USD for a game I might not get around to playing. I am happy, though to pay 2-4 USD for a game that looks interesting, even if I only play it for a couple hours.

It's a happy time to be a gamer and a difficult time to be a distributor. I really want GOG to continue to succeed.
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istudedinre: ... What I'm saying is this: if you lower your standard price, you may not get any additional sales from people like me, and people who were willing to pay the original fair price will now be paying you less. I think your experiment may end up demonstrating this. ....
So, have you bought anything additional in the experiment?
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istudedinre: ... What I'm saying is this: if you lower your standard price, you may not get any additional sales from people like me, and people who were willing to pay the original fair price will now be paying you less. I think your experiment may end up demonstrating this. ....
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Trilarion: So, have you bought anything additional in the experiment?
No. Like I said, I'm working through some big games right now, and I'm not actively seeking more games. With sales, there is a compelling reason to buy now (the price will go back up), but with an "always low" price, I might as well wait to buy. I really do have plenty of games...
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istudedinre: ...
No. Like I said, I'm working through some big games right now, and I'm not actively seeking more games. With sales, there is a compelling reason to buy now (the price will go back up), but with an "always low" price, I might as well wait to buy. I really do have plenty of games...
Thank you, I was confused a bit but now it's clear. I'm in the same situation. Each year for christmas sales I just buy all the games for the coming year to play. And I have enough. But I don't like extreme sales, I like permanent low prices more. However I feel that in a sale the prices are even lower. But I guess that in the end it doesn't matter so much. As long as you buy games it doesn't matter if during a sale or during normal time, a game sold is a game sold.
Post edited April 06, 2013 by Trilarion
I've supported the experience by buying the full D&D pack :) Thanks a lot gog
I have supported and bought Commandos Ammo Pack - 3.99 for hours of realy good gameplay, that's cheaper than magazines, books or the cinema. A more than fair price.

Just out of intetest, a scientific experiment needs a control subject so that differences can be measured and a time frame,
Will thete be a time limit to the new prices ? Will you update and report to the community your findings ?
I've always thought GOG needed a $2,99 or $3,99 price point for these old, stand alone games that publishers don't want to give away for free, but cannot justify a $5,99 price tag because they don't have any sequel to bundle them with. Games like Rex Nebular, or Sid and Al's Incredible Toons, or any of the Sierra games that don't have "Quest" in their title. Also to maintain a certain consistency when it comes to pricing, I mean, Blue Force for six bucks would be a very hard sell when you can get the complete Police Quest collection for four more dollars.
The experiment has failed, I assume? New prices are gone...
Shame.
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Novotnus: The experiment has failed, I assume? New prices are gone...
Shame.
It hasn't failed; the experiment ended. We're going to analyze the results and then either resume it or not, depending on what the results are. :)