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In the scientific method, an experiment is an empirical method that arbitrates between competing models or hypotheses. Experimentation is also used to test existing theories or new hypotheses in order to support them or disprove them.
Take a look at the steps of the scientific method:
1. Make observations.
2. Formulate a hypothesis.
3. Design and conduct an experiment to test the hypothesis.
4. Evaluate the results and accept or reject the hypothesis.

STEP 1: Observations
#1 People who play computer games like games. This is mostly true, however some gamers who played these titles might disagree.
#2 People who buy computer games prefer spending less money to spending more money.
It hurts us a little bit, but the truth is games don't sell for $1000+
#3 GOG.com users are people who play, like, and buy computer games.

STEP 2: Hypothesis
If GOG.com lowers the prices of some games in our catalog, more gamers will be inclined to buy and enjoy those high-quality products.

STEP 3: The Experiment
We're trying out some new pricing, and we want to see what you guys think of it.

Prices changed from $5.99 to $3.99:
Alien Shooter, Celtic Kings, Commandos Ammo Pack, Constructor, Empire Earth, Knights and Merchants, Litil Divil, Lords of Magic, Lords of the Realm, Mobile Forces, Myst: Masterpiece Edition, Outcast, Personal Nightmare, Realms of Haunting, Rollercoaster Tycoon, Simon the Sorcerer, Waxworks.

Prices changed from $9.99 to $6.99:
Broken Sword 4: The Angel of Death, Ceville, Evil Genius, Haegemonia Gold Edition, King's Bounty, Moto Racer 3, Red Baron Pack, Restaurant Empire, Sanitarium, Shadowgrounds, Sherlock Holmes, The Incredible Machines, Warlords Battlecry 3

STEP 4: Results
This is where you, our dear gamers, step in and decide the results. We'd like to offer you the best games in history on PC & Mac for the most affordable prices, but we need to fund testing, coding, bundling, and securing rights to even more classics. So we want to see if this brings us and our partners more money overall, even though there's less per individual sale. That's the argument we'd like to make, but we'll see what the results from you guys actually are as we try out our new price points.
really love this website and the way they do business in a fair and ethical way and keep the customer base informed and give us, the community, options on what we want the most. Why can't more business be like this??
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GOG.com: This is where you, our dear gamers, step in and decide the results. We'd like to offer you the best games in history on PC & Mac for the most affordable prices, but we need to fund testing, coding, bundling, and securing rights to even more classics. So we want to see if this brings us and our partners more money overall, even though there's less per individual sale. That's the argument we'd like to make, but we'll see what the results from you guys actually are as we try out our new price points.
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Lexor: I think these are kind of faulty sentences. You will not get more money from the people who already bought these games and as these games have rather long history here on GOG so most people who wanted them, already own them. Bettter experiment would be to release two similar games at the same time and then watch the results. You will not get reliable results in the way you are proposing.
Not Sure if i woud agreeed to that.
I grabbed Commandos, Broken sword The angel of Death and Constructor due to the new price experiment
even though they have been here long i didnt get them before.
i Woud likely not have gotten them if it hadnt been for the price was lowered.

And no, i dont only buy games on sale
i also buy games on full price.
Post edited February 20, 2013 by Lodium
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ZivilSword: Outcast for four dollars … nope. Having the German version for nine or ten years, but still did not play it (part of a compilation). Should I?

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jmhebert: Bought: Moto Racer 3, Ceville, Personal Nightmare and Mobile Forces. Then threw in StarTopia for fun.
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ZivilSword: Moto Racer 1 (and partly 2) are way more fun. Part 3 wants to be realistic, which is deadly for a fun racer.
I bought Startopia last month. Just played the tutorial, then the first level and lost. I still don’t know why … am I too slow? The game is kind of strange. Maybe I should try Dungeon Keeper 2 (same compilation) …
You have had Outcast for 10 years and never played it? What a travesty! It's quite strange, but one of my favorite games.
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Pheace: ...
Sure, if the 'experiment' stays. Currently they're saying 1-2 months though, a period in which I doubt they have a sale planned for these games.

Naturally this + sale is great stuff
With sales of at least 50% discount they have spoiled their own customer base (not only GOG but also Steam, Amazon, ...). For me there is never a reason to buy outside a sale now and the normal price is completely meaningless to me.

However maybe they want to change this. I would like it, because having to pay attention to sales is stealing time and not really efficient. I think they should start with Telltale games, where the normal price is soo incredibly high, that you need 80% discounts to sale them.

If the experiment is limited to two months, than it's like a long promo with 30% discount, worse than usual sales. I guess therefore it has to stay to have an effect. Unfortunately there is not much point for me to buy these games again. I wish I could and support GOG.

I could imagine another experiment: No sale, but the promise that if the bought game is offered cheaper on this site or Steam or GamersGate within the next six months you automatically get the difference to the lowest price at the end of the six month period as store credit here. That would effectively fight the sale hysteria. You could buy anytime then. I would like this. :)
Post edited February 20, 2013 by Trilarion
I have to say that in the range of <10$ the actual price of a game is rather meaningless to me and does not influence my purchase decission. Buying something for 6$ or 4$ really makes no difference at the end of the month. If i really want something i'd gladly buy it for 6$ and if not i won't change my mind because i save 2 bucks. Its a different thing in the range of 20-40$ of course.
The actual news here, as I see it, is the introduction of more pricing levels besides $5.99 and $9.99, which is something I regard as long overdue. I may even have suggested that in that one free-text box in one of those surveys a while ago.

It's not just about more flexibility in the pricing of the games already in the catalogue - especially the $3.99 pricing potentially makes games that are even older than the oldest games in the catalogue right now marketable at all.

I don't know about the choice of present games to re-price, though... Outcast and the Lords of the Realm pack were actually worth $5.99. ;)
You know, I think I might have a better idea. This may have been suggested, already, but I don't have time to wade through all 17 pages of responses. P

First, let me say a few things for the sake of clarity.

1) GOG is always my first choice when it comes to buying games, period. You guys are just too great for me to go anywhere else unless I can't get the game from GOG.

2) If a game comes to GOG and I do not buy it immediately, it is because I'm simply broke. If I had money to spend, I would be buying things instantly almost every time.

3) Despite #2 being true, there are a few games on GOG that are over-priced. Your fans have been upfront with you about this.

With the above being true, I was thinking of a tweak to GOG's purchasing process that might yield interesting data. Specifically, I was thinking about shopper feedback. What if your customers had a simple and easy way to provide feedback about what they think a game is worth? Perhaps three choices which could be toggled, such as "I'd buy this for more," This price is fair," and "I'd pay less for this?" Another option would involve a sliding scale which would allow customers to "vote" on a "value" for the game, but that would be more complicated to implement. Still, it would be pretty nifty to see the game you're thinking of buying for $5.99 is worth $9.99 in the eyes of GOG customers.

Anyway, that's just a suggestion. Perhaps someone could start a forum thread for discussion. I think GOG's community is perfectly capable of coming up with new ways to spur sales. Even a forum discussion of "What makes you buy a game at GOG, and what makes you hold off buying a game?" would prove useful, I believe.

-Khalaq

PS. (I have no reason not to buy Ceville, now.)
Post edited February 20, 2013 by Khalaq
EDIT to OP:

Added Sanitarium and Restaurant Empire at $6.99 price point.
Post edited February 20, 2013 by G-Doc
Darn, missed buying Divinity II before it ended. O_o
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Khalaq: What if your customers had a simple and easy way to provide feedback about what they think a game is worth? Perhaps three choices which could be toggled, such as "I'd buy this for more," This price is fair," and "I'd pay less for this?" Another option would involve a sliding scale which would allow customers to "vote" on a "value" for the game, but that would be more complicated to implement. Still, it would be pretty nifty to see the game you're thinking of buying for $5.99 is worth $9.99 in the eyes of GOG customers.
Maybe we should make a thread where people could write a list of games on GOG and what they think the price should be, and we could tally the list/collate the data as it comes in? Or maybe make a poll-type deal for all GOG titles on the GOG wiki where users can login and vote for the price they think each title is worth? :\
There will be a problem with the results because:

1. You need two test groups to compare, one with the cheaper prices and an other with the more expensive prices (I want to be in the group with the cheaper prices) ;)

2. You have to release a catalogue of maybe four or five new games which noone owns right now. Some people own already some or all games from the list, so they don't buy it again.
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Lexor: I think these are kind of faulty sentences. You will not get more money from the people who already bought these games and as these games have rather long history here on GOG so most people who wanted them, already own them. Bettter experiment would be to release two similar games at the same time and then watch the results. You will not get reliable results in the way you are proposing.
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Lodium: Not Sure if i woud agreeed to that.
I grabbed Commandos, Broken sword The angel of Death and Constructor due to the new price experiment
even though they have been here long i didnt get them before.
i Woud likely not have gotten them if it hadnt been for the price was lowered.

And no, i dont only buy games on sale
i also buy games on full price.
The keyword is "most people" - not "all" :)

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Silverhawk170485: There will be a problem with the results because:

1. You need two test groups to compare, one with the cheaper prices and an other with the more expensive prices (I want to be in the group with the cheaper prices) ;)

2. You have to release a catalogue of maybe four or five new games which noone owns right now. Some people own already some or all games from the list, so they don't buy it again.
Another person with similar opinion to mine.
Maybe I'm reading way, way too much into this, but if this pricing experiment sticks, $3.99 would be an interesting price for individual games that wouldn't ordinarily be priced at $5.99... like the Infocom games that haven't hit GOG yet.
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Lodium: Not Sure if i woud agreeed to that.
I grabbed Commandos, Broken sword The angel of Death and Constructor due to the new price experiment
even though they have been here long i didnt get them before.
i Woud likely not have gotten them if it hadnt been for the price was lowered.

And no, i dont only buy games on sale
i also buy games on full price.
I'm going to venture it's a small subset of people who don't buy games fullprice/during sales, but will buy them if the full price gets lowered (yet still higher than a sale).
For a moment there, I thought the 'New Pricing Experiment' was about increasing the prices. This is really generous but will these games still be included in weekend sales and gem promos in the future? Because if so, some people may still want to wait for those to go on sale before buying, so you'll be taking in even less than before. I am happy with the current pricing of classic games and thanks to weekend, Christmas and summer sales, I have bought all the games I want for fantastic prices.