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In the scientific method, an experiment is an empirical method that arbitrates between competing models or hypotheses. Experimentation is also used to test existing theories or new hypotheses in order to support them or disprove them.
Take a look at the steps of the scientific method:
1. Make observations.
2. Formulate a hypothesis.
3. Design and conduct an experiment to test the hypothesis.
4. Evaluate the results and accept or reject the hypothesis.

STEP 1: Observations
#1 People who play computer games like games. This is mostly true, however some gamers who played these titles might disagree.
#2 People who buy computer games prefer spending less money to spending more money.
It hurts us a little bit, but the truth is games don't sell for $1000+
#3 GOG.com users are people who play, like, and buy computer games.

STEP 2: Hypothesis
If GOG.com lowers the prices of some games in our catalog, more gamers will be inclined to buy and enjoy those high-quality products.

STEP 3: The Experiment
We're trying out some new pricing, and we want to see what you guys think of it.

Prices changed from $5.99 to $3.99:
Alien Shooter, Celtic Kings, Commandos Ammo Pack, Constructor, Empire Earth, Knights and Merchants, Litil Divil, Lords of Magic, Lords of the Realm, Mobile Forces, Myst: Masterpiece Edition, Outcast, Personal Nightmare, Realms of Haunting, Rollercoaster Tycoon, Simon the Sorcerer, Waxworks.

Prices changed from $9.99 to $6.99:
Broken Sword 4: The Angel of Death, Ceville, Evil Genius, Haegemonia Gold Edition, King's Bounty, Moto Racer 3, Red Baron Pack, Restaurant Empire, Sanitarium, Shadowgrounds, Sherlock Holmes, The Incredible Machines, Warlords Battlecry 3

STEP 4: Results
This is where you, our dear gamers, step in and decide the results. We'd like to offer you the best games in history on PC & Mac for the most affordable prices, but we need to fund testing, coding, bundling, and securing rights to even more classics. So we want to see if this brings us and our partners more money overall, even though there's less per individual sale. That's the argument we'd like to make, but we'll see what the results from you guys actually are as we try out our new price points.
It may be worth adding the new price points to the search function under Browse Games to make it easier to see which games have had their prices reduced, rather than having to go back to the News page.
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Zacron: However, Commodore 64 was different hardware, and we need more than a program like DOSBox to run them.
Technically you’re right. Practically the C64 is more than 30 years old. I was able to simulate fullspeed with a standard PC more than 15 years ago. As a rule of thumb: every system can be flawlessly emulated (if the specs are available) after ten years of technological progress. So, the PS2 nowadays can be emulated with my quad-core i5 from Intel.

For the C64, I don’t know if there’s a special BIOS but Vice64 runs already for years without having to download a ROM from shady sources. The Amiga instead is another story … (By the way: Vice64 offers way more comfort than standard DOSbox because I can pause, resume and save a memory snapshot. This is only possible with a special version of DOSbox, not the official one.)
Interesting Experiment! Looked through the games and added one to my wishlist. Was just hoping for a few more platformers as I am a big fan of that type of games. Otherwise this would probably have been a successful price reduction for me.
The new price points are a nice turn, especially the $3.99 one. But I don’t see the point of the $6.99 point. This is quite lower than 9.99, almost on the level of the standard $5.99.

Let’s see what we have, without the .99ers:

• $4 (new)
• $6
• $7 (new)
• $10

I’m wondering why GOG did not introduce an $8 price point. This would be the middle between “not worthy for $10” and “more quality than $6”. Also in that case the prices would have been equidistant: 4, 6, 8, 10. Each category $2 more. Now the $7 point doesn’t fit. These are games “a little bit better than $6”, but why the single dollar? I would have made them $7.99. Just a hint to GOG. :) (And yes I know that I would have to pay more for the same game …)
Post edited February 18, 2013 by ZivilSword
So are we to assume that these are the games that are selling poorly? Then why the #@%& is Realms of the Haunting, my favorite game of all time, up there???? Apparently people here at GOG have really bad taste...
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tinyE: Is GOG hurting? When i worked for B&N they tried tried something similar with pricing and called it an "experiment". What they wanted to actually call it was "Amazon is kicking the shit out of us." Shit I hope not, I love it here.
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TheEnigmaticT: No, we're not hurting. This is an actual experiment. For the last 6 months or so, we've been trying a variety of different sales to see what works and what doesn't--things like our "Pay what you want" packages or the "Pick 5, Pay $10" sale as well as the "End of the World" promo. I come from the web development background, where the mantra is "Fail early, fail often" because that's how you learn.

So we're learning. :)
Wow, that´s awfully nice to hear :)
Well, you won´t have much from me in this experiment, since I bought all the games I wanted during Christmas sale, and from then on I´m steadily buying one game at a time. That just means I usually find price points just and affordable.

But I am sure people will appreciate the price drop in general.
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Zacron: However, Commodore 64 was different hardware, and we need more than a program like DOSBox to run them.
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ZivilSword: Technically you’re right. Practically the C64 is more than 30 years old. I was able to simulate fullspeed with a standard PC more than 15 years ago. As a rule of thumb: every system can be flawlessly emulated (if the specs are available) after ten years of technological progress. So, the PS2 nowadays can be emulated with my quad-core i5 from Intel.

For the C64, I don’t know if there’s a special BIOS but Vice64 runs already for years without having to download a ROM from shady sources. The Amiga instead is another story … (By the way: Vice64 offers way more comfort than standard DOSbox because I can pause, resume and save a memory snapshot. This is only possible with a special version of DOSbox, not the official one.)
I know we have the technology to emulate the C64, and the Amiga, and the Vic20 and all that, however, my point was that unless someone makes a full-on open-source OS that is as compatable with Amiga software as DOSBox is with Dos Apps, we should not get our hopes up to ever be able to buy The Killing Game Show from GOG.. And yeah, that hurt as I typed it.
Vote for these games with regular price points below $5.99:

Armed And Dangerous ($4.99)
The Basement Collection ($3.99)
Ben There, Dan That! / Time Gentlemen, Please! ($4.99)
Beyond Oasis ($2.99)
The Binding Of Isaac ($4.99)
Breath Of Death VII: The Beginning / Cthulhu Saves The World ($2.99)
Comix Zone ($2.99)
Dark Void Zero ($4.99)
Dead Pixels ($2.99)
The Dig ($4.99)
Dr. Robotnik's Mean Bean Machine ($4.99)
Dungeons Of Dredmor ($4.99)
Ecco The Dolphin ($2.99)
Ecco: The Tides Of Time ($2.99)
Geometry Wars: Retro Evolved ($3.99)
Home ($2.99)
Indiana Jones And The Fate Of Atlantis ($4.99)
Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade: The Graphic Adventure ($4.99)
Loom ($4.99)
McPixel ($4.99)
The Misadventures Of P.B. Winterbottom ($4.99)
Noitu Love 2: Devolution ($4.99)
Oddworld: Munch's Oddysee ($4.99)
Oniken ($4.99)
Ristar ($2.99)
Samorost / Samorost 2 ($4.99)
The Shivah ($4.99)
Sonic 3D Blast ($4.99)
Sonic CD ($4.99)
Sonic Spinball ($4.99)
Sonic The Hedgehog ($4.99)
Sonic The Hedgehog 2 ($4.99)
Sonic The Hedgehog 3 & Knuckles ($4.99)
Star Wars: Dark Forces ($4.99)
Star Wars: Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II ($4.99)
Star Wars: Jedi Knight: Mysteries Of The Sith ($2.99)
Star Wars: Starfighter ($4.99)
Streets Of Rage ($2.99)
Streets Of Rage 2 ($2.99)
Streets Of Rage 3 ($2.99)
Super Hexagon ($2.99)
Thirty Flights Of Loving ($4.99)
Tobe's Vertical Adventure ($4.99)
Toki Tori ($4.99)
Vectorman ($2.99)
Vectorman 2 ($2.99)
VVVVVV ($4.99)
Wizorb ($2.99)
X-COM: Apocalypse ($4.99)
X-COM: Enforcer ($4.99)
X-COM: Interceptor ($4.99)
X-COM: Terror From The Deep ($4.99)
X-COM: UFO Defense ($4.99)
Post edited February 18, 2013 by Barry_Woodward
I'm one for getting good deals but I have no interest in any of those games. So while I hope your "experiment" works, it has to be in the buyers interest. ;)
Post edited February 18, 2013 by flashpulse
I never understood the point of the price points. I mean, I get that it's nice to have a ten dollar maximum for old games, but what's the selling point behind "We will never sell a $3 game, or a $4 game, or a $7 game"? I say that more flexibility is a good thing, although since I already own all of the games I want from this list, I can't vote with my wallet.
Post edited February 18, 2013 by BadDecissions
GOG is a lot of fun but it is limited.

I don't think bringing in new promotions will improve sales. Let's look at the overall picture -

To increase sales you need a generation of gamers who've grown up and are missing those days when games were just fun, and they didn't have wives, children and jobs that got in the way of them playing those games.

Let's face it, the games weren't better really, we were just better. Completely stress free with imaginations full of magic and a capacity to escape reality that was so simple coz we didn't have "STUFF" demanding our time!

Games have improved, games are better. We don't wanna play Baldurs Gate again really, we just wanna be 25 again, or 15 again, or whatever age you were at that time when everything in your life was so simple that it made that game so good to reminisce about today.

So, it's quite clear that the original business model of GOG was amazing for those of a certain age.
To suddenly have access to a wealth of classics from when we were Fab - games that were previously quite difficult to buy - was amazing. We all jumped in because of our memories.

If GOG shut down today, and re-opened in 15 years with all the games that have gone before, it would enjoy the same initial mass purchasing of classics all over again.

But as a day-to-day, year-to-year model, Good Old Games doesn't make sense. You have to miss the game, reminisce about the game and be surprised to see the game available at such a great price in order to purchase the game

But, for now, that's just for us. Very few people from the younger generations give a flying f*ck that Baldurs Gate started it all.

Personally, I prefer Morrowind to Skyrim. Probably coz Morrowind was my first experience of that gaming model. But those who've never played Morrowind won't go to it after playing Skyrim. It doesn't work that way.

So, as much as GOG is great for us, it probably is only for us (for now).... and, let's face it, a lot of those who were there in the beginnings don't wanna go back either.
Sometimes I'd love to re-play Icewind Dale, but Guild Wars or Borderlands or Assassin's Creed tempt me away from all that I did when I was 20-odd and I find myself moving with the times myself.
I mean, I BUY all these games, I really think I'm gonna play em.... but somehow really Good New Games keep taking priority!
I think the "Pick 5, Pay $10" sale promo was my favorite promo so far. I would definitely pick up another 5 if the same games were offered in the same type of promo again. I hope this promo is repeated with a larger selection of titles. As for the new current price drops, for the most part I have almost always waited for huge Holiday Sale promos, Weekend Sale promos, or promos like the periodic Classic Gem promos to purchase anything. The new price drops you have here don't even match the usual 50% off Holiday Sale promo price drops, so my normal decision to have the discipline to wait until a sale to make the most out of my money is going to win out in the end. I have a large GOG/Steam library, for the most part I can almost always wait a few months for things to hit a sale. I think I might have to buy System Shock 2 at full price though@!#
Interesting ... I already have all the games from the list that I would probably buy, but I'm hopeful the pricing scheme is a success as Barry_Woodward (and no doubt many others in this thread) has pointed out there are games priced below GOG's normal price points that I'm sure lots of people would like to see on GOG one day.

For those who don't have it and like flight sims (or are even on the fence about them), I can whole-heartedly recommend the Red Baron Pack.

Another game beyond Barry's list above which is sold at a lower price point ($3.99) is the remastered Sherlock Holmes Consulting Detective games from Zojoi (who is also remastering Shadowgate):

http://www.gog.com/wishlist/games/sherlock_holmes_consulting_detective

Please vote for it!
Post edited February 18, 2013 by crazy_dave
I'm curious as to how feasible it would be to turn the retro gaming market into an "all you can eat" subscription service. If GOG could incorporate Arcade and console emulation into it's fold i think a subscription system, like Spotify, would make more sense for older games as long as a business model can be created to please rights holders.
I think you could place several Pinball titles under the $3.99 bracket. I own them all except for Ball of Steel, but i have to say some of them are quite overpriced when the quality take into consideration. Even Pinball Gold Pack also can be deemed as bit overpriced since it has no bonus content and one of the title from the pack missing it's BGMs.