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In the scientific method, an experiment is an empirical method that arbitrates between competing models or hypotheses. Experimentation is also used to test existing theories or new hypotheses in order to support them or disprove them.
Take a look at the steps of the scientific method:
1. Make observations.
2. Formulate a hypothesis.
3. Design and conduct an experiment to test the hypothesis.
4. Evaluate the results and accept or reject the hypothesis.

STEP 1: Observations
#1 People who play computer games like games. This is mostly true, however some gamers who played these titles might disagree.
#2 People who buy computer games prefer spending less money to spending more money.
It hurts us a little bit, but the truth is games don't sell for $1000+
#3 GOG.com users are people who play, like, and buy computer games.

STEP 2: Hypothesis
If GOG.com lowers the prices of some games in our catalog, more gamers will be inclined to buy and enjoy those high-quality products.

STEP 3: The Experiment
We're trying out some new pricing, and we want to see what you guys think of it.

Prices changed from $5.99 to $3.99:
Alien Shooter, Celtic Kings, Commandos Ammo Pack, Constructor, Empire Earth, Knights and Merchants, Litil Divil, Lords of Magic, Lords of the Realm, Mobile Forces, Myst: Masterpiece Edition, Outcast, Personal Nightmare, Realms of Haunting, Rollercoaster Tycoon, Simon the Sorcerer, Waxworks.

Prices changed from $9.99 to $6.99:
Broken Sword 4: The Angel of Death, Ceville, Evil Genius, Haegemonia Gold Edition, King's Bounty, Moto Racer 3, Red Baron Pack, Restaurant Empire, Sanitarium, Shadowgrounds, Sherlock Holmes, The Incredible Machines, Warlords Battlecry 3

STEP 4: Results
This is where you, our dear gamers, step in and decide the results. We'd like to offer you the best games in history on PC & Mac for the most affordable prices, but we need to fund testing, coding, bundling, and securing rights to even more classics. So we want to see if this brings us and our partners more money overall, even though there's less per individual sale. That's the argument we'd like to make, but we'll see what the results from you guys actually are as we try out our new price points.
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TheEnigmaticT: It hasn't failed; the experiment ended. We're going to analyze the results and then either resume it or not, depending on what the results are. :)
Good to know :) Shame I bought my old horror adventures before it started... ;)
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TheEnigmaticT: It hasn't failed; the experiment ended. We're going to analyze the results and then either resume it or not, depending on what the results are. :)
Does this mean I'll have to change the prices in the wiki back, or should I wait before doing it?
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TheEnigmaticT: It hasn't failed; the experiment ended. We're going to analyze the results and then either resume it or not, depending on what the results are. :)
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JMich: Does this mean I'll have to change the prices in the wiki back, or should I wait before doing it?
I don't know. w0rma and his team are analyzing the data.
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TheEnigmaticT: It hasn't failed; the experiment ended. We're going to analyze the results and then either resume it or not, depending on what the results are. :)
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JMich: Does this mean I'll have to change the prices in the wiki back, or should I wait before doing it?
hopefully you'll have to change them to reflect a Greater % off standard price, when the results pan out
^_^
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TheEnigmaticT: I don't know. w0rma and his team are analyzing the data.
They are also analyzing the game bundles I guess?
And damn it, knowing how long the analysis process may be, I can't complain that they are doing it slow...
I wish I could have supported this experiment more, I just wasn't interested in the offered games. :( Only game I bought was Myst (and I got stuck very early in the beginning and haven't played it since ...).
Post edited April 19, 2013 by Leroux
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TheEnigmaticT: I don't know. w0rma and his team are analyzing the data.
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JMich: They are also analyzing the game bundles I guess?
And damn it, knowing how long the analysis process may be, I can't complain that they are doing it slow...
They are indeed. And I believe that they have preliminary results on the game bundles stuff. But it will be a few weeks before we have solid conclusions on any of it, because we all have other things we're doing as well. :)
If System Shock 2 went down to 6.99, I would buy it before you could say "25% off". XD
For some non-scientific anecdotal feedback, I would say that the current price points are actually pretty fair and my hypothesis is that there won't be a statistical difference in the change.

My Observations based on my personal buying choices on GOG (~30 game sample size) is that GOG customers purchase games primarily that 1) they owned before and wouldn't mind playing again for a reasonable price 2) Games that they heard good things about before, never bought, then forgot about, then were curious to try them out 3) Games that had a cult following and people sometimes look at you like you're crazy if you hadn't played them back in the day 4) games that have never been heard of, but seem like they have awesome gameplay mechanics and/or story.

Occasional sales have prompted me to purchase some games that I wouldn't have otherwise, but lowering the price point by $3.00 overall when you're under the $10 range is probably not going to prompt a huge number of new sales, although it will make the case for some.

This just gave me an idea for a new feature that might be good for the site: when games are requested by the community there should be an option to pledge a dollar amount for it which can be taken as a promise to purchase if the game is at that dollar number or less. This can help motivate companies to post their product and help with market research in how much people are willing to spend for an old title based on the product's perceived value.
From my point of view, this experiment is (potentially) a little unfortunate; lower price points than $6 could be incredibly useful, if GOG wants to release indie games that are cheaper than $6 elsewhere, or ever decides to release something really old (like Ultima 1 or Might and Magic 1; they got away with those because they were parts of series and could be bundled together) that it would be hard to justify spending $6 on. If they look at the data and say, "Lowering the prices of the $6 a little didn't make them sell better, and that's the only criterion we're using, so we're getting rid of the lower price point" then I think they're only considering part of the picture.
Post edited May 03, 2013 by BadDecissions
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juxtapoe: ... pledge a dollar amount for it which can be taken as a promise to purchase...
That sound like a great idea. However, how would GOG actually be able to get people to fulfill their pledge if they had changed their mind in the meantime?

Still, certainly worth I try I feel.
why is rct 5.99 now?!
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Th3R3n3gad3: why is rct 5.99 now?!
Look here: http://www.gog.com/forum/general/new_pricing_experiment/post435
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juxtapoe: ... pledge a dollar amount for it which can be taken as a promise to purchase...
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Deklasun: That sound like a great idea. However, how would GOG actually be able to get people to fulfill their pledge if they had changed their mind in the meantime?

Still, certainly worth I try I feel.
Well, just one of many possibilities, but, here comes a wall of text: gog.com could use this to weight the votes of the people that actually are the most likely to buy games from them by giving a point for every dollar's worth of game they have purchased similar to how credit cards set money aside in the form of points. The points can be used to pledge for games in the wishlist, and then the used points are gone from the gog-user's account. If their request is fulfilled, they get a discount on the game equal to 10% of their pledge amount. Gog.com pays money to the publisher/developer equal to 10% of the pledge amount regardless of actual sales. I believe in this way the risk is bridged equally all the way around. gog.com is protected since the money that they are giving to the publisher/developer is money that has been set aside on previous sales, and the money they are giving up is going to be more useful than paying the salary of a Sales Analyst, since this will help see who is voting for a game to be introduced and is actually likely to buy it through gog.com (without a feature like this, gog.com could be routinely introducing games that have 10,000 votes for implementation, without knowing that those 10,000 are fans of that game and those 10,000 actually already own the game and just want other people to buy the game and missing out on sales opportunities with games that have 3000 votes from people that actually want to buy the game). The buyer isn't risking much other than virtual points that they are accumulating through their normal purchasing habits, although, the limited nature of points will ensure that they think carefully before assigning their points to pledge a product. And finally the developer/publishers that own the rights to games have less of a risk with signing up with gog.com since they can see the demand is here, and 10% of that demand is ready to be cashed in on immediately. If 3000 goggers purchase a games for $5.00-$10.00 and .50-$1.00 is set aside for each of them to pledge with and they use that to pledge for Game X varying amounts between $5 and $10 (depending on what they'd be willing to buy the game for) then the company with the rights to Game X will see that there is a pot sitting on gog.com for their product of about $2000 - $3000 that goes directly to their company on the first day, plus that represents another $20,000 - $30,000 in likely sales from the people that were willing to pledge. Plus, that is just a sample size of the overall community that might be willing to purchase the game once on gog.com, but didn't decide to use their points to pledge it (or didn't have available points). For a game that retails between $5-$10 (retired or indie, etc) that is not a prospect and makes their partnership with gog.com much more of a no-brainer. It may even give gog.com more negotiating power and/or result in publishers pushing their merchandise onto gog.com rather than gog.com soliciting. (I would suggest showing pledge amounts next to votes on the wishlist so the owners of game rights can see the pent up demand on gog.com even if they're not currently in talks with gog.com - this could be especially useful for companies that are hesitant to venture into the world of DRM-Free).
Paragraphs dude, paragraphs.