It seems that you're using an outdated browser. Some things may not work as they should (or don't work at all).
We suggest you upgrade newer and better browser like: Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer or Opera

×
In the scientific method, an experiment is an empirical method that arbitrates between competing models or hypotheses. Experimentation is also used to test existing theories or new hypotheses in order to support them or disprove them.
Take a look at the steps of the scientific method:
1. Make observations.
2. Formulate a hypothesis.
3. Design and conduct an experiment to test the hypothesis.
4. Evaluate the results and accept or reject the hypothesis.

STEP 1: Observations
#1 People who play computer games like games. This is mostly true, however some gamers who played these titles might disagree.
#2 People who buy computer games prefer spending less money to spending more money.
It hurts us a little bit, but the truth is games don't sell for $1000+
#3 GOG.com users are people who play, like, and buy computer games.

STEP 2: Hypothesis
If GOG.com lowers the prices of some games in our catalog, more gamers will be inclined to buy and enjoy those high-quality products.

STEP 3: The Experiment
We're trying out some new pricing, and we want to see what you guys think of it.

Prices changed from $5.99 to $3.99:
Alien Shooter, Celtic Kings, Commandos Ammo Pack, Constructor, Empire Earth, Knights and Merchants, Litil Divil, Lords of Magic, Lords of the Realm, Mobile Forces, Myst: Masterpiece Edition, Outcast, Personal Nightmare, Realms of Haunting, Rollercoaster Tycoon, Simon the Sorcerer, Waxworks.

Prices changed from $9.99 to $6.99:
Broken Sword 4: The Angel of Death, Ceville, Evil Genius, Haegemonia Gold Edition, King's Bounty, Moto Racer 3, Red Baron Pack, Restaurant Empire, Sanitarium, Shadowgrounds, Sherlock Holmes, The Incredible Machines, Warlords Battlecry 3

STEP 4: Results
This is where you, our dear gamers, step in and decide the results. We'd like to offer you the best games in history on PC & Mac for the most affordable prices, but we need to fund testing, coding, bundling, and securing rights to even more classics. So we want to see if this brings us and our partners more money overall, even though there's less per individual sale. That's the argument we'd like to make, but we'll see what the results from you guys actually are as we try out our new price points.
avatar
GoldenCrow: Its a real pity I've already bought all the games I'm currently interested in. On the other hand you can't get enough good PR
This pretty much.
We believe that if you drop the games to 0,99 $ you will have much more sells then if you try to sell them to 9,99 or 6,99 or 3,99... Because with this price drop you will not only show to people that money is not important but also show that a classic good game can be offered for a very democratic price... and people who for example spend 10 dollar a month will buy more games and enjoy more.... and is this not the goal of Gog offer all people the chance to try a game from the past.... Time will judge that Gog will grow stronger ... you can compare it to the world of the living and the world of the death.... the living grow but the number of death grows more.... this also so with old school games ... they are not bussinessfull but they exist and confirm their existance with gog .....

I say better 20 games sold for 0,99 then 2 for 9,99......
I havent played most of the games I bought (probably 60% of them). but again, there are people like me who are perfect bait for price drops and discount.
avatar
dazun: If GOG shut down today, and re-opened in 15 years with all the games that have gone before, it would enjoy the same initial mass purchasing of classics all over again.

But as a day-to-day, year-to-year model, Good Old Games doesn't make sense. You have to miss the game, reminisce about the game and be surprised to see the game available at such a great price in order to purchase the game

But, for now, that's just for us. Very few people from the younger generations give a flying f*ck that Baldurs Gate started it all.
I think you are wrong, GOG does make sense as a model. I have bought games I had forgotten about completely and only remembered after I saw them go on sale, or initially added to the GOG library, or mentioned by other people. I have bought many games that I never actually knew about back in the day due to reading impressions or reviews by others that praised those old games. I have bought many games that I never had the money to buy or hardware to play back in the day. None of those fit your confined and restrictive standard of how/why GOG works FOR YOU.

I have seen so many people who weren't even alive, or were children, when these old games were released years ago directed towards GOG. People in their teens and 20s wanting to play older classic titles that still hold up today and have the kind of quality gameplay that is missing in so many new games today. Why wouldn't I direct someone towards Baldur's Gate today if they want the one of the best CRPG experiences ever? Your ideas and anecdotal experience certainly doesn't match up to mine or the huge interest I have seen taken by many younger people today in good old Classic titles now easily available on this cheap DRM Free service.
The new prices are great. However, all these games were even cheaper less than 2 months ago - therefore, currently, the new prices will only appeal to the people who missed the winter sale, or didn't have quite enough money to buy them back then, or just want to show support for the new experimental price points by buying the games.

You probably won't see the full effect of these new price points until you put the games on a sale, with 50% off the new price point - if you're planning to do that. If you're not planning to do that, then the new price points are just a clever (if a bit sneaky) way to promote a 30-33% discount (which probably wouldn't trigger many sales if labeled as such). ;)
Post edited February 18, 2013 by Psyringe
unfortunately i already own about any of that games that i like...
Not to be nitpicky, but you cannot "accept" hypotheses, because you usually view the whole thing from the null hypothesis point. You can only keep those, never accept them.
would like to help with the experiment but alas already own what i like from this group
might look into a few others if they catch my interest
avatar
dazun: snip
While what you said is true for yourself, you should be careful about making assumptions that everyone with the same background as you feel the same way as you. Take me for example, while I like many new games, most of the games I play are older ones, both games I liked in the past and games that are new for me. While I do agree that games have improved in many ways since say "The golden age of PC gaming in the 90's" I think that there are many very good things about older games that are hard to find in newer games. This is especially true if you compare high budget titles from the 90's to those of today. While newer games have become very good at making immersive 3D worlds and action games and shooters have become quite good at telling a story, there is (if you ignore the Indie scene) a great lack of innovation and original gameplay in the games from major developers and almost every game is some kind of action game while strategy games and especially simulations are rare. (Luckily the Indie scene does make up for this somewhat.) So if your taste in gaming go beyond action games, old PC games should be essential, unless you have some kind of pixel phobia.

And while the gameplay is a major reason for me to like the old games, I'm not one of those "graphics doesn't matter types. I think that graphics are very important and they determine how much I like a game to a great extent. But that doesn't impair me from enjoying games with bad graphics since there are other qualities to a game as well. An while game graphics are better now technically, they are not necessarily better artistically. In fact, many recent games in Fantasy settings have much worse graphics than many of those released in the 90's and first part of the 00's.
Post edited February 18, 2013 by Sargon
I will grab a few and personally like the idea!
Post edited February 18, 2013 by mutilatedmessiah
King's Bounty is a steal at that price.
avatar
dazun: If GOG shut down today, and re-opened in 15 years with all the games that have gone before, it would enjoy the same initial mass purchasing of classics all over again.

But as a day-to-day, year-to-year model, Good Old Games doesn't make sense. You have to miss the game, reminisce about the game and be surprised to see the game available at such a great price in order to purchase the game

But, for now, that's just for us. Very few people from the younger generations give a flying f*ck that Baldurs Gate started it all.
avatar
seaspanky: I think you are wrong, GOG does make sense as a model. I have bought games I had forgotten about completely and only remembered after I saw them go on sale, or initially added to the GOG library, or mentioned by other people. I have bought many games that I never actually knew about back in the day due to reading impressions or reviews by others that praised those old games. I have bought many games that I never had the money to buy or hardware to play back in the day. None of those fit your confined and restrictive standard of how/why GOG works FOR YOU.

I have seen so many people who weren't even alive, or were children, when these old games were released years ago directed towards GOG. People in their teens and 20s wanting to play older classic titles that still hold up today and have the kind of quality gameplay that is missing in so many new games today. Why wouldn't I direct someone towards Baldur's Gate today if they want the one of the best CRPG experiences ever? Your ideas and anecdotal experience certainly doesn't match up to mine or the huge interest I have seen taken by many younger people today in good old Classic titles now easily available on this cheap DRM Free service.
It's always good to have another angle :)
Nice to hear that people of the younger generation are enjoying the games we enjoyed "way back when". My children and their friends give me very blank looks when I show them the "glory" of Good Old Games. They feel a bit sorry for me and try not to embarrass me :)
However, all that aside, thanks for "putting me right". I hope, when the scales are finally balanced, your experience is more common than mine :)
Tempting, tempting, but I promised to myself to not to buy any new games until I get my backlog sorted... but then again... these are old games.
I have a lot of your test $3.99 games. For me as long as it's a old game (can't work on the new PCs or WAY to fast to run) and under $10 I'll buy it. If it's a new/ish game (e.g Assassin's Creed) then I don't mind paying more but not over $30.
avatar
carnival73: Lol. Those are some pretty bad games. XD
avatar
Fenixp: Dude! Outcast!
Well, that and also Lords of Magic which I didn't notice (it's a good game but most pass it over due to it's brutal difficulty).

90% of those newly discounted games are some pretty big flops though. Lol.