It seems that you're using an outdated browser. Some things may not work as they should (or don't work at all).
We suggest you upgrade newer and better browser like:Chrome,Firefox,Internet Explorer orOpera

×
avatar
Freakgs: First of all: no need to patronize me, I'm very well aware of the implications, as stated above.
I'm not patronizing you, I'm just telling you that an actual package designed for a given distribution is a preferrable option when supporting said distribution. I for one prefer just extracting an executable/directory into my /home folder and just go from there, but that's not really the correct way to do your official installation for official support of an operating system - it's fairly easy to make a script to extract or even convert a package into one compatible with another distro, but if GOG should say "Oh, we support Ubuntu", they should do precisely that, in fullest extent of the word 'support', without the need for the user to make his own shortcuts and his own references.

avatar
Freakgs: Those systems were indeed designed the way they were and that was: a multiuser environment were applications are executed with user privileges. Also, keep in mind that ANYBODY with physical access can compromise your machine at will. It doesn't matter if you're using Windows or Linux. You could simply boot from a rescue CD and chroot into your installation.
Well... Duh, they could also kick the computer open, rip the harddrive out and burn your house, I don't think people use those precautions out of the fear that their close ones will sabotage their computer on purpose :-P
Ok, my apologizes, I realized that I did something very stupid here:
I didn't really express myself well. So some of the discussion here is my fault:

I prefer package managers all the way over custom installations to /home folders but if I have to make a choice between not getting anything and getting a simple .tgz file I choose the latter.
That being said if Gog would ever officially support Linux they would probably have to stick to .deb files (maybe add .rpm files) as Ubuntu is *hands down* the most used distribution for desktop users.
I'm using Gentoo but I wouldn't mind having to deal with .deb files as I understand that GoG simply can never support all distributions, especially not meta distributions.

And yes, I get what you're trying to say but my point was simply: there's no way to secure a computer other people can get their hands on. All you can do is prevent your personal data from being "stolen" by encryption.
Packaging is a minor issue to deal with. DEB, RPM or what not can be dynamically created by the installer, depending on the distribution. I don't think GOG worries about this or should worry. That's not what requires much effort to support.
Post edited February 13, 2013 by shmerl
Steam for Linux is now official. Time to wake up GOG!
Post edited February 14, 2013 by shmerl
avatar
Freakgs: That is a good point but this is more or less true for multiuser environments where you need that extra security. In that case you're probably not allowed to install games anyways, as you would have to ask your administrator (aka root) to install that specific package.

If it's about your own system: why would you do that there?
For logical separation of data and executables.. Even on a single user system it still serves to thwart various exploits.
avatar
shmerl: Steam for Linux is now official. Time to wake up GOG!
It's time for GOG to wait and see what happens, just like they did with Mac support. If Linux Steam is a success (I hope it is), then they have no real reason not to add Linux support, especially now that they have decided that "all or none" is not a hard rule for supporting a particular OS.
Steam was brought above just as an example. There are other examples which predate steam - like Humbe Bundle. GOG can learn from them as well.
Post edited February 16, 2013 by shmerl
Desura does have a great working Linux client, too. I recently bought some indie games from there, you guys could check that one out, too.
avatar
Freakgs: That is a good point but this is more or less true for multiuser environments where you need that extra security. In that case you're probably not allowed to install games anyways, as you would have to ask your administrator (aka root) to install that specific package.

If it's about your own system: why would you do that there?
avatar
dvolk: For logical separation of data and executables.. Even on a single user system it still serves to thwart various exploits.
No it's stupid to mix up system and applications (base of the infamous "DLL Hell" under windows, where it was fixed years ago by stricter separation). Also, I think this is the core of many linux ecosystem problems. The missing separation between system and apps is due to the distro concept and the unix roots in the 70s.

About steam, take a look here: https://github.com/ValveSoftware/steam-for-linux/issues?state=open it's scary.

The only sane possiblity for linux binary app deployment over a broad range of distros for GOG would be a bundle system like: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero_Install http://portablelinuxapps.org/ http://www.pgbovine.net/cde.html ... but sadly some support by the community/distros is needed for this... don't see this coming.
Many of Desura Linux games (and Humble Bundle ones) already use bundle installs successfully. Nothing in the distros prevents you or any developer from using that approach.
avatar
shmerl: More and more stuff appears on Steam for Linux. But many people are annoyed by Steam DRM and avoid their service altogether. GOG needs to seize the opportunity and offer DRM free Linux distribution channel! There is no point to wait any longer
GOG are my retailer of choice due to their stance on DRM and regional pricing. Still, I use Steam as well, and quite a lot at that, but will only be using it to buy Valve games as those are exclusive to Steam on the PC. Nevertheless, as GOG are not supporting Linux at the present moment, I won't be spending any money with them until that changes. Desura may win me over in the mean time as they do DRM free gaming as well and support Linux to boot. Only way to make myself heard is with my wallet, right?
Post edited February 21, 2013 by Future_Suture
I suspect that GOG's decisiveness to support Linux will coincide with their parent company CD Projekt Red releasing their games (Witcher 3 and Cyberpunk) for Linux. And who knows when that will happen. So far they seem to avoid it, and instead supporting locked up consoles instead of open PC operating systems.
Post edited February 21, 2013 by shmerl
avatar
shmerl: I suspect that GOG's decisiveness to support Linux will coincide with their parent company CD Projekt Red releasing their games (Witcher 3 and Cyberpunk) for Linux. And who knows when that will happen. So far they seem to avoid it, and instead supporting locked up consoles instead of open PC operating systems.
Supporting the consoles means they make money or have a huge potential to make money. in addition to the Windows and Mac sales.

Looking at Steam's HW survey for Jan 2013, I've done a bit of plotting (and intend to do so for the rest of the year) Mac OS X sits at 3.56% and Linux at 1.12% and at 1.86% if I add the percentage of "Other". I've no idea what "Other" means in their OS usage chart.

So, there. I guess GoG are watching and waiting. Serving DRM free titles is already great for Linux users since most titles work with either Wine or Dosbox.
Supporting the consoles in addition to Windows and Mac means that their game engine is very portable already, and it wouldn't take them much effort to make Linux ports from which which they can profit as well. But their reluctance probably reflects in GOG's reluctance.
avatar
shmerl: I suspect that GOG's decisiveness to support Linux will coincide with their parent company CD Projekt Red releasing their games (Witcher 3 and Cyberpunk) for Linux. And who knows when that will happen. So far they seem to avoid it, and instead supporting locked up consoles instead of open PC operating systems.
avatar
silviucc: Supporting the consoles means they make money or have a huge potential to make money. in addition to the Windows and Mac sales.

Looking at Steam's HW survey for Jan 2013, I've done a bit of plotting (and intend to do so for the rest of the year) Mac OS X sits at 3.56% and Linux at 1.12% and at 1.86% if I add the percentage of "Other". I've no idea what "Other" means in their OS usage chart.

So, there. I guess GoG are watching and waiting. Serving DRM free titles is already great for Linux users since most titles work with either Wine or Dosbox.
Linux's market share on Steam is at a definite 1.27% for when you select WIndows Only, Linux Mint pops up at the bottom. There are definitely a few more Linux distros hidden away under Other as well. I just hope it grows even further. There may be more Mac OS users as far as I am aware, but if there are more Linux gamers than Mac OS gamers, then that will definitely count for something. Team Fortress 2, Counter-Strike, and Counter-Strike: Source are already on Linux. Garry's Mod, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, and Left 4 Dead 2 are coming soon as well. What I am really waiting for is DOTA 2. That will be big.