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Future_Suture: Do you have a source for that that is not entirely in Polish? Google Translate can't even translate that website for me.
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shmerl: In the interview questions are in Russian, but answers are in English. Just fast forward to 1:29:16 in the audio for the relevant part.
I am amused. When the podcast started, I heard nothing but Polish which now turns out to be Russian. When I skipped forward several times, all I heard was Polish (Russian). Guess I was just unlucky, thanks.

Additionally, someone needs to show GOG and CD Projekt RED what Ryan "Icculus" Gordon has to say on the matter.

And here's the video version for GOG and CD Projekt RED.
Post edited February 16, 2014 by Future_Suture
The beginning was indeed in Polish :) But the answer about Linux is all in English.

I agree, if Marcin Iwiński could talk to some folks like Ryan Gordon about Linux support, that would help a lot to dispel these kind misconceptions (for both GOG and CD Projekt Red).
Post edited February 16, 2014 by shmerl
CD Projekt Red developers attended Linux talks at Steam dev days:

http://www.reddit.com/r/Games/comments/1y2hnr/cd_projekt_red_considering_the_witcher_3_for/cfgxcq7

They were at devdays, which focused a ton of time on Linux development. I saw witcher 3 shirts at every Linux dev talk. I'm sure they know
That's a step in the right direction. If they'll release Witcher 3 for Linux, GOG Linux support will come right away.
Post edited February 17, 2014 by shmerl
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shmerl: CD Projekt Red developers attended Linux talks at Steam dev days:

http://www.reddit.com/r/Games/comments/1y2hnr/cd_projekt_red_considering_the_witcher_3_for/cfgxcq7

They were at devdays, which focused a ton of time on Linux development. I saw witcher 3 shirts at every Linux dev talk. I'm sure they know
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shmerl: That's a step in the right direction. If they'll release Witcher 3 for Linux, GOG Linux support will come right away.
Nevertheless, did CD Projekt RED get a free Steam Machine?
No idea, I hope they got the main thing there - better knowledge of Linux ;)
Humble Store introduced a dumb idea of regional pricing. GOG has a clear advantage here, but you need to roll out Linux support really. Then you'll have both advantages.
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shmerl: Humble Store introduced a dumb idea of regional pricing. GOG has a clear advantage here, but you need to roll out Linux support really. Then you'll have both advantages.
That Humble place has been getting worse and worse but at least there's Linux support.
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zchronos: GOG should do the same as "Flippfly" with the game "Race the Sun". GOG sell the game WITH A CODE, the user go to website of the developer and insert the code. Result: The user have the linux version from the developer (and the support too).

Easy and simple.
Exactly!
Purchased Race the Sun here, played it a lot and then sometime later redeemed my Flippfly serial.
Now I have it running (beta) on Ubuntu like a beaut too.
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shmerl: Humble Store introduced a dumb idea of regional pricing. GOG has a clear advantage here, but you need to roll out Linux support really. Then you'll have both advantages.
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Future_Suture: That Humble place has been getting worse and worse but at least there's Linux support.
Yeah, that's annoying
But ''developers can manually set their own pricing for different regions if they wish.''
Interesting, huh?
Post edited February 18, 2014 by vicklemos
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shmerl: Papers Please for Linux is out: https://www.humblebundle.com/store/p/papersplease_storefront
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drinnen: Excellent. Makes me think the confusion I felt when I bought Papers Please on humble only to find no download because it didn't have a Linux version was worth it. After that I felt maybe I should have bought it on GOG but this vindicates my feeling that whilst GOG clearly have no interested in Linux it's better to buy these indie games which have a high percentage making Linux version on Humble even if at release it's only available on Windows.
That's why I always check /r/linux_gaming, steamdb and gamingonlinux
And Linux will be an even bigger deal for many after SteamOS, I suppose
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Future_Suture: That Humble place has been getting worse and worse but at least there's Linux support.
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vicklemos: Yeah, that's annoying
But ''developers can manually set their own pricing for different regions if they wish.''
Interesting, huh?
That's why I decide on what I'm willing to pay and just wait them out. I've got far too much choice already available to waste money buying new games at high prices before I consume other parts of my entertainment backlog.
All that Linux growth...
Simply put i generally don;t buy games (on steam) unless they have a linux version too. I have bought some games here to support the idea of drm-free but i got pretty much all old games i want. For new releases I have to go on steam unfortunately because of linux support ....
I can;t understand the support problem and i seen some issues raised by gog. It is not necessary to support 10 linux distros. Just go with ubuntu LTS and be sure that the community will sort the rest.
So , before gog becomes my main game shop i will need to see the games that support linux on steam with linux support here as well.
Wine is a workaround not a solution and i don;t have time to fine tune each game.
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apanz3r: Wine is a workaround not a solution and i don;t have time to fine tune each game.
Looks like gog is sharing your uncomfortable feelings with the requirement of "fine tuning"... but with native linux software. The gog users expect a polished experience without hassle. Addressing the vast variety of the linux ecosystem (the so called "fragmentation") with software typically involves "fine-tuning" (you called it "community will sort it") on many levels. Which is seen as unreasonable risk and burden by gog (and also by you).

About wine, John Carmack disagrees... and frankly, seeing Wine as way to use a existing, stable API would be a pragmatic solution approach for linux ecosystem support for third party software providers (ISVs or distributors like gog).
Post edited February 21, 2014 by shaddim
John Carmack was completely off when he talked about Linux in the recent times. Luckily no one else agrees with him on that. It's his personal view and I'm not sure what caused him to have it.
Post edited February 21, 2014 by shmerl
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shmerl: John Carmack was completely off when he talked about Linux in the recent times. Luckily no one else agrees with him on that. It's his personal view and I'm not sure what caused him to have it.
He explained it pretty clearly: to much hassle (fragmented ecosystem: "making some form of “D3D interop” extension for OpenGL [...] is a lot easier than making dozens of completely refactored, high performance native ports."), to less users ("1-2% marketshare"). Addressing Wine (and the underlying stable API/ABI) reduces the implications of point 1 a little bit and brings it maybe in a more reasonable economical relationship with point 2.
Post edited February 21, 2014 by shaddim