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shmerl: A pity this Metro game is tied to Steam. Is this because of the problem discussed above, or because the developer likes DRM?
No, Metro only uses achievements, which are quite easy to disable (as proven by cracked Steam games), and Cloud I think, which ... Well, if Steam ain't available it just doesn't do anything. I think it's safe to say that there's no good reason for Metro: Last Light to be Steam only, other than DRM.
Kamlin found this ressource: http://www.jonobacon.org/2013/08/21/ubuntu-in-a-nutshell-app-upload-process/ which is indicating that ubuntu now really gets seriouswith 14.10 in providing a bundle supported third party app infrastructure. Some infrastructure GOG could than target. Also some alternative to the walled garden Steam infrastructure.

Good sign, I like it. :)
Ubuntu is becoming increasingly marginalized with their Mir mess. I'd be careful in making them a primary target. Valve made a mistake going that route. The bundling approach itself can be used of course, as an idea.
Post edited September 12, 2013 by shmerl
I was just reviewing the latest round of Mint updates when I noticed some interesting packages...

http://www.linuxbase.org
The Linux Standard Base was created to lower the overall costs of supporting the Linux platform. By reducing the differences between individual Linux distributions, the LSB greatly reduces the costs involved with porting applications to different distributions, as well as lowers the cost and effort involved in after-market support of those applications.
When targeting Linux as a platform, application developers want to have some assurance that the code they write on one Linux distribution will run on other Linux distributions without having to go through extra effort. This matches their experiences on other popular platforms, such as Windows or Mac OS X.

In addition, application developers want to ensure that the platform as a whole does not diverge. Even if an application works on today's distributions, will it work on tomorrow's?

The LSB workgroup has, as its core goal, to address these two concerns. We publish a standard that describes the minimum set of APIs a distribution must support, in consultation with the major distribution vendors. We also provide tests and tools which measure support for the standard, and enable application developers to target the common set. Finally, through our testing work, we seek to prevent unnecessary divergence between the distributions.
This isn't new at all. But I'm not sure how helpful this ended up to be.
Not exactly about GOG, but related. On potential plans of CD Projekt Red to release Witcher 3 for Linux (in particular SteamOS).
I guess such kind of release will trigger GOG Linux support as well.
Post edited September 30, 2013 by shmerl
I think that SteamOS will support Game Streaming and not Native Games for Linux.

If CDProjekt Red release a Linux version of The WItcher 3.... http://youtu.be/E2VCwBzGdPM
Game streaming is an optional feature of SteamOS. Native gaming is its main point. Steam Machine (i.e. SteamOS targeted console planned by Valve) would be rather pointless if it won't be able to function as a standalone console. So Valve is going to push for native gaming. Streaming is just a side bonus.

When people ask about SteamOS support, they don't ask about streaming, they ask about native Linux games.
Post edited September 30, 2013 by shmerl
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shmerl: ...native Linux games.
Would it mean that Witcher 3 could be run on a Linux without Steam OS?
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shmerl: ...native Linux games.
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Trilarion: Would it mean that Witcher 3 could be run on a Linux without Steam OS?
If it actually does get a port to SteamOS, yes, it'll run on Ubuntu as well (and other GNU/Linux distributions that runs Steam). Whether or not GOG change their and starts to offer Linux support is a different matter, but I deem it quite likely if, again, the game actually does get a Linux (SteamOS) port.
Post edited October 01, 2013 by Maighstir
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Maighstir: If it actually does get a port to SteamOS, yes, it'll run on Ubuntu as well (and other GNU/Linux distributions that runs Steam). Whether or not GOG change their and starts to offer Linux support is a different matter, but I deem it quite likely if, again, the game actually does get a Linux (SteamOS) port.
If it gets a SteamOS port, shouldn't that be CD Projekt RED and not GOG?
And I was under the impression that it's the norm for devs to offer/ do support on their Steam releases, no?
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shmerl: ...native Linux games.
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Trilarion: Would it mean that Witcher 3 could be run on a Linux without Steam OS?
I would guess... "no" in general.

SteamOS will most propably have an architecture very different from "typical" distros...more in the direction of android or the steam platform. If distros will than follow Valve's SteamOS example and try to achieve and maintain compatibility, we will see. My guess would be "no", the distros will stand their current position that software has to support them...and not way around.

PS: most probably some walled garden element like the steam client will be mandatory for running a software. So even if the game itself would be compatible, the required client could be not available or incompatible on other distros.
Post edited October 01, 2013 by shaddim
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shmerl: ...native Linux games.
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Trilarion: Would it mean that Witcher 3 could be run on a Linux without Steam OS?
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shaddim: SteamOS will most propably have an architecture very different from "typical" distros...
Nothing suggests that yet, and it contradicts to what Valve said so far. I think exactly the opposite. SteamOS is Linux with Steam on top. May be they make some kernel optimization tweaks for their console, but it's generally common Linux middleware. And since CDPR release their games DRM free, they'll take care of making it not dependent on Steam. So, if CDPR will ever release their upcoming games for SteamOS, we should expect them to work with any regular Linux (given middleware compatibility) and released outside Steam as well. CDPR also stated that they'll take care to address both interfaces (controller gameplay and keyboard + mouse gameplay) properly.

Just a reminder, GOG is owned by CD Projekt Red. And if they start shipping Witcher 3 for Linux, they'll enable Linux support on GOG at some point for sure, since that's their own distribution channel.
Post edited October 01, 2013 by shmerl
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shaddim: ...
Well... I do believe that the easiest thing Valve could do, and I think there's absolurtely no reason for them to not do so, would be to grab one of the existing Ubuntu distros and change it around to suit their needs. That would suggest Linux compatibility in general.
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Maighstir: If it actually does get a port to SteamOS, yes, it'll run on Ubuntu as well (and other GNU/Linux distributions that runs Steam). Whether or not GOG change their and starts to offer Linux support is a different matter, but I deem it quite likely if, again, the game actually does get a Linux (SteamOS) port.
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HypersomniacLive: If it gets a SteamOS port, shouldn't that be CD Projekt RED and not GOG?
And I was under the impression that it's the norm for devs to offer/ do support on their Steam releases, no?
Yes, but I'm quite certain that for every platform that any The Witcher runs on, and which is open to third-party distributors (which GNU/Linux certainly is), a version will be delivered via GOG.

Even on SteamOS, Steam is not much a distribution and API platform (one which CD Projekt will certainly use, they already use The same for Windows and OS X after all - but since both platforms are open to third-party distributors, they also offer the game from their own store: GOG.com, and I believe that if any The Witcher is available on Steam for a specific target OS, a GOG.com edition for the same will also exist).