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Good news/bad news time:

First, the good news: HarperCollins just started selling C.S. Lewis's Narnia books as eBooks directly to the consumer via narnia.com and cslewis.com!

And now the bad news: It's infested with Adobe's nasty DRM.

http://gigaom.com/2013/10/30/harpercollins-begins-selling-ebooks-directly-to-readers-starting-with-cslewis-com-and-narnia-com/
meh, I don't get the whole e-book thing. You can't beat the feel and smell of a book made from dead trees.
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qux: meh, I don't get the whole e-book thing. You can't beat the feel and smell of a book made from dead trees.
You're in NZ. Have you ever had to pay $30 for shipping a $2.39 book from the US?
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qux: meh, I don't get the whole e-book thing. You can't beat the feel and smell of a book made from dead trees.
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Starmaker: You're in NZ. Have you ever had to pay $30 for shipping a $2.39 book from the US?
Given that English is the official language of New Zealand, they don't have as much need to order books from the US as the rest of us. Not that I order them from the US anyway, I order them from Britain. Thankfully, Amazon UK has free shipping of books to Denmark.
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qux: meh, I don't get the whole e-book thing. You can't beat the feel and smell of a book made from dead trees.
I prefer hauling my tablet with hundereds of e-books rather than an oversized bag with a couple of books.
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qux: meh, I don't get the whole e-book thing. You can't beat the feel and smell of a book made from dead trees.
While I love the feel of an actual book (there's just nothing like a real book in your hands), there's something to be said for the ability to carry basically your entire library around with you when you're travelling.
I LOVE putting books up in my library. I love the physicality of holding a book while you read it. The smell of the book... HOWEVER, the convenience of reading on an e ink device won me over. I really like the Kindle Paperwhite. I swore I would never use an ereader, but I have been converted.

I wish publishers would give you an ebook version when you bought a physical book. Maybe through a code or something. DVDs and Blurays do this. In gaming it is becoming more and more common to buy a game once and get the PC, Mac and Linux versions. C'mon publishers!
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Starmaker: You're in NZ. Have you ever had to pay $30 for shipping a $2.39 book from the US?
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Wishbone: Given that English is the official language of New Zealand, they don't have as much need to order books from the US as the rest of us. Not that I order them from the US anyway, I order them from Britain. Thankfully, Amazon UK has free shipping of books to Denmark.
That depends on availability, really. I have a commercial intermediary in the US, and just this week I had to ship a lot of rare books from Australia to the US (the sellers wouldn't ship to Russia), and holy crap I'm broke again. Plus I have Australian acquaintances (but not close enough to drag them into this whole shipping business) who reported problems with availability of some current stuff. So, I think, if impersonal-you have any special interest at all (and we're on GOG, of course we do) where physical stuff matters, you can't help but be boned by shipping at least occasionally.

Edit: for a direct comparison, I also bought four books for the swindle. Buying them in the UK would've cost me £40+, the swindle versions were $10.79 total.
Post edited October 30, 2013 by Starmaker
As someone who does not have an e-reader, how does ebook-based DRM work exactly? From what I gather there it refers to the file format it comes in? The kind you can easily go to a website and convert to something else?

All I know is is that I have a few .epub and .mobi files that I obviously can't read on my computer so I had them converted to .pdf files, and word documents in a couple of instances too. If that's all there is to book DRM then bookworms definitely have it easier than gamers when it comes to DRM. Unless I'm missing something here...
Post edited October 30, 2013 by cannard
It is easy to get real books very cheap, and I don't see why digital versions are often more expensive then their paper back versions.

And boo to adobe drm. I thought most of that was all ready cracked.
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cannard: As someone who does not have an e-reader, how does ebook-based DRM work exactly? From what I gather there it refers to the file format it comes in? The kind you can easily go to a website and convert to something else?

All I know is is that I have a few .epub and .mobi files that I obviously can't read on my computer so I had them converted to .pdf files, and word documents in a couple of instances too. If that's all there is to book DRM then bookworms definitely have it easier than gamers when it comes to DRM. Unless I'm missing something here...
EPUBs are easily read on computers. They really are just zip files containing HTML documents (and images and fonts if they need them). They use CSS stylesheets for the formatting, too.

You can use programs such as Calibre and Sigil to read them. Calibre can also do conversions between formats and Sigil can be used to edit EPUBs or even create your own.


As for DRM e-books, it is something to do with encryption. I think Adobe DRM is account based, so encrypts based on user ID or something, so that only you can read it. But it can be stripped out to make your EPUBs DRM free.
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qux: meh, I don't get the whole e-book thing. You can't beat the feel and smell of a book made from dead trees.
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Starmaker: You're in NZ. Have you ever had to pay $30 for shipping a $2.39 book from the US?
Even when shipping is factored in, it usually still works out cheaper to buy from overseas. Typically I only buy from overseas when I need a programming book; If I happen to buy a book overseas for the price you mentioned, there's a place that offers free shipping to New Zealand so it's not a problem for me.
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qux: meh, I don't get the whole e-book thing. You can't beat the feel and smell of a book made from dead trees.
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tomimt: I prefer hauling my tablet with hundereds of e-books rather than an oversized bag with a couple of books.
to each their own I suppose.
Post edited October 30, 2013 by qux
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eagarza12: I wish publishers would give you an ebook version when you bought a physical book. Maybe through a code or something. DVDs and Blurays do this. In gaming it is becoming more and more common to buy a game once and get the PC, Mac and Linux versions. C'mon publishers!
Look at Amazon's new matchbook service. On supported books that you purchased through them (future and past purchases) they are giving you an ebook for anywhere from $0-3.

So far none of my books are supported. Though, I do think I repurchased most of them as Amazon ebooks already.
Post edited October 30, 2013 by jjsimp
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qux: meh, I don't get the whole e-book thing. You can't beat the feel and smell of a book made from dead trees.
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tomimt: I prefer hauling my tablet with hundereds of e-books rather than an oversized bag with a couple of books.
Personally, I prefer the power not go out in the middle of
I like real books for some things, but I've collected so many of them over the years that they take up way too much physical space for me and a great many of them are things I'd only want to look at while at a computer anyway. As part of an effort in downsizing physical items of copius space consumption I've changed my preference to e-books as I can fit a bazillion more books into the physical space of a single book (on a hard disk). I really like that propasition, plus a great many of them are now searchable depending on the format in which they're made. The only thing lacking for me was software of some sort to manage the entire growing collection in a way like a media player such as XBMC manages videos and music and whatnot. And then a few months ago I discovered...

Calibre E-book librarian software

Calibre is absolutely amazing and free open source software. This one seals the deal for me :) I'll still use paper books where it is more useful to me, but my large scale preference is ebooks now at least, much in the same way I prefer owning real audio CDs but tossing them into a box in the basement after ripping them all to FLAC format to have on my hard disk instead. :)
Post edited October 30, 2013 by skeletonbow