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Have someone read a good book about this subject? The best suggestion (in my oppinion) will be marked.
This question / problem has been solved by CrashToOverrideimage
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gyokzoli: There is an amazing book by a German writer (Wolfgang Jeschke) called The Last Day of Creation.
It's about the war for the oil which takes place in the prehistoric ages. A must read book!

I’ve read it and it is well worth recommending. I bet it was inspiration for creators of "Original War".
Post edited August 29, 2010 by Sulibor
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rs2yjz: Naw, just hanging with Mr. Glover. They should remake Quantum Leap starring Crispin Glover actually. Would watch that show.
Think strange things (maybe Time related) may be going on around us all the time, but our perception forces us to shut them out, or perceive them to fit our needs as we get older, like Robert Anton Wilson's giant spider in his backyard.
also can't forget to mention,
A WRINKLE IN TIME !

You're alright, you're alright.
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wodmarach: Without time there is no atomic vibration, without atomic vibration there is no heat so the universe would be at 0kelvin the universe is on average around 2.7kelvin thus there must be atomic movement and thus there must be time for those atoms to move in, Q.E.D.
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Navagon: As I stated earlier, what I'm saying is that it all boils down to atomic vibration. Atomic vibration isn't something you can travel back in. That's very oversimplified, I know. But I'm just repeating myself here.

Why not? There is nothing to stop you traveling back in time times arrow can point in either direction hell physics relies on being able to do this you first run your theory forward and make sure you get your result you then spin times arrow and work from the result backwards to make sure you get the starting point.
Atomic vibration has very little to do with time travel btw or are you assuming that because your atomic vibration will be an infinately small amount different you'll not be able to interact? I want you to note we've been talking about time travel we have NOT been talking about being able to interact when you get there. however since most universal constants don't seem to have changed in 10 Billion years (of which atomic vibration is one) I think we can safely assume that you'd be fine.
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wodmarach: Why not? There is nothing to stop you traveling back in time times arrow can point in either direction hell physics relies on being able to do this you first run your theory forward and make sure you get your result you then spin times arrow and work from the result backwards to make sure you get the starting point.

And has anyone actually managed to point time's arrow in another direction? Because I'd like to know why this isn't all as entirely baseless as it seems to me.
Whoa, Whoa, WHOA!
So you guys are saying time travel IS NOT putting on a Hendrix Vinyl, sitting in a bean bag chair, and staring at a disco ball?
Mind=Blown.
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CrashToOverride: So you guys are saying time travel IS NOT putting on a Hendrix Vinyl, sitting in a bean bag chair, and staring at a disco ball?

Yeah, you forgot the flares, tank top and lava lamp.
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CrashToOverride: So you guys are saying time travel IS NOT putting on a Hendrix Vinyl, sitting in a bean bag chair, and staring at a disco ball?
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Navagon: Yeah, you forgot the flares, tank top and lava lamp.

THAT'S WHY IT NEVER WORKS! I knew it had to be something! Brb, Morlocks attacking.
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wodmarach: Ahh but then the Grandfather Paradox kicks in...
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Navagon: Well it would do if time gave a toss about human events. Why are people so convinced that such things matter to a completely non-sentient force? Oh yes, because it's a human construct to begin with.

The grandfather paradox is not about human events. It is simply an example of why time travel should be impossible (in a single-timeline universe). The human "face" on the example is simply to make it more understandable to humans.
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CrashToOverride: H.G Well's The Time Machine.
/thread

Thanks, I've found this book (and Asimov's The End of Eternity, thanks zebber) in portuguese language, wich was a pleasant surprise, since it's my native language. :)
Between the two, The Time Machine got me more interested, but both seems good and I'll read them.
About the other recomendations, I'll have a look at them, but it surely won't be much easy/fun to read like the two mentioned above.
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Drelmanes: About the other recomendations, I'll have a look at them, but it surely won't be much easy/fun to read like the two mentioned above.

How easy it will be depends on your English skills, I suppose. As for how fun... I stopped reading Danish translations when I was 15. Firstly, because there weren't all that many of them (Denmark is a small country, so not much gets translated), and secondly because they just weren't as good as the originals. Something always gets lost in translation, and with some authors and books in particular, the way they use the language is as much a part of the book as the story itself (Douglas Adams in particular, Heinlein's The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress, A Clockwork Orange, etc.)
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Wishbone: How easy it will be depends on your English skills, I suppose.

I think I need to improve my English skills before I can read a whole book.
I feel that, if I'm going to read a book, I need to comprehend every word written in it, to fully understand the history.
I see no point in reading, if I gonna skip the parts with words that I don't know the meaning.
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Wishbone: As for how fun... I stopped reading Danish translations when I was 15. Firstly, because there weren't all that many of them (Denmark is a small country, so not much gets translated), and secondly because they just weren't as good as the originals. Something always gets lost in translation, and with some authors and books in particular, the way they use the language is as much a part of the book as the story itself (Douglas Adams in particular, Heinlein's The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress, A Clockwork Orange, etc.)

That's true, the translations can't really compare with the originals, but for those who aren't fluent in other languages (in this case, English), it's the best option.
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Wishbone: Firstly, because there weren't all that many of them (Denmark is a small country, so not much gets translated).

I have a similar problem. I couldn't find translation for many books recommended here (maybe I'm looking in the wrong place?). Books like Harry Potter or other world-wide known titles are translated to portuguese, but good luck in finding a not-so-known/obscure book from another country translated. But this is how it works I think, if a book has a huge sucess, it gets translated in many countries (it's very possible), otherwise, you need to have luck to someone translate it in your country.