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It's official! GOG.com supports Mac OS X.

We're bringing a part of our massive catalog of all-time classics to Mac, starting with an impressive 50 titles for Mac gamers to play and enjoy. 28 of the 50 titles, the best games in history, including Syndicate, Ultima series, or Wing Commander, will be playable on the Mac OS X for the first time ever--exclusively on GOG.com. The complete line-up reflects the diversity of available games unmatched by other distributors: classics like Simcity 2000, Crusader: No Remorse, Little Big Adventure, Theme Hospital mix with Anomaly Warzone Earth, Tiny & Big: Grandpa’s Leftovers, Botanicula, and The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings. Speaking of monster-hunter Geralt and The Witcher 2, the Enhanced Edition of this award-winning mature fantasy RPG was released on Mac just today and is available on GOG.com with a 25% discount (that's only $22.24) for the next 48 hours.

Weeklong Promo: Mac & PC Essentials
We have also prepared a set of specially selected games from various genres that will be available 50% off for the next week: The Witcher Enhanced Edition, Crusader: No Remorse, Theme Hospital, Little Big Adventure, Postal Classic and Uncut, and Simcity 2000 are all available for 50% off--that's as little as $2.99 for unforgettable classics. This promo ends Thursday, October 25 at 6:15 PM GMT. However, The Witcher Enhanced Edition will be available for 50% off only until Saturday, October 20 at 6:45 PM GMT.

Remember, the 50 is just the beginning--we promise to release more amazing games on Mac in the near future. What titles? To find out and play even more best games in history check our website regularly, become a fan on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or give us a nice +1 in Google+.
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Trilarion: So, the good thing is that when you buy a game here you get Mac and Windows versions together? That's nice.
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SimonG: Isn't that industry standard?
not everywhere and for all games, some companies are selling their mac ports alone...
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Trilarion: So, the good thing is that when you buy a game here you get Mac and Windows versions together? That's nice.
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SimonG: Isn't that industry standard?
Not exactly, many games on Steam have Steamplay which allows you to download and play the game on Both platforms but there are games where you have to buy the Mac version seperately, like Call of Duty Black ops on steam for example
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Red_Avatar: Considering Macs can use Bootcamp or some ancient PC to extract DOS games and then move the files to their Mac DOSBox build, I don't think this is that big a deal. It's less of a hassle, of course, but it wasn't a huge issue - neither is Linux really. If you're going to use Linux, an OS that is fiddly to work with, then having to use WINE to extract GOG files and downloading your own DOSBox seems childsplay. Of course, not going to protest this move - just saying, people who say "finally" or "why not Linux" should know it's just a bit of saved time.
I agree but for me, the important thing is that when they get a release like, for example, machinarium or trine or torchlight, mac users can now (hopefully) get the native mac version drm free as well :)
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Psyringe: Actually, no. It depends on the game. CHeck GamersGate, there are lots of games which offer the Windows and Mac version in one bundle, and lots of games which offer them separately for each platform (I think the Paradox games are a good example)-
As I said in the conference thread already, GG is pretty much the only major exception. Both of GOG's main competitors, i.e. Steam and the Humble Bundle/Store do it this way. GOG had zero choice in this matter.
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Roman5: Not exactly, many games on Steam have Steamplay which allows you to download and play the game on Both platforms but there are games where you have to buy the Mac version seperately, like Call of Duty Black ops on steam for example
Which, again, is because Blops for Mac is cheaper. There's no other way to sell the two versions for different prices than to treat them as separate products.
Post edited October 19, 2012 by bazilisek
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SimonG: Isn't that industry standard?
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bazilisek: No, that's only because GOG always treats their gamers fair. Being nice is actually part of their DNA! Guillaume said so, so it must be true.
You seem bitter or a little angry about something.
Post edited October 19, 2012 by mondo84
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Psyringe: Actually, no. It depends on the game. CHeck GamersGate, there are lots of games which offer the Windows and Mac version in one bundle, and lots of games which offer them separately for each platform (I think the Paradox games are a good example)-
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bazilisek: As I said in the conference thread already, GG is pretty much the only major exception. Both of GOG's main competitors, i.e. Steam and the Humble Bundle/Store do it this way. GOG had zero choice in this matter.
Well, they did have a choice, but I agree that doing it differently would have been a bad one business-wise.

With regard to Guillaume's statement - it was a promo show, you don't really expect them to say "And also, we will give you the Mac and PC versions both for the price of one game, because the current market situation forces us to, no matter if we want to or not", do you? ;)

Also, he didn't even say anything wrong, GOG _is_ very nice and customer-friendly compared to other shops.
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mondo84: You seem bitter or a little angry about something.
Nah, I just really dislike marketing-speak. A simple "of course" would have done its job much better there.
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xyem: +1271 Add Mac OS X versions of games +7084 Add Linux versions of games
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tarasis: I understand your point, however how much engineering effort is required? Which distro do you support? Which desktop enviroment? The thing with the Mac (and iOS for that matter) is that there is a relatively limited set of machines and hardware to test against. Compared to Linux which generally runs on custom built hardware with a wide array of graphics and sound chips. (or Android which has a shed load of variants in terms of hardware and os versions)
What desktop environment you use doesn't make any difference at all. The variety of distros with different versions of libraries in different places are obviously a much bigger problem. I wouldn't recommend supporting native Linux versions of most games just because most of them are very poorly tested! But there's no reason why there couldn't be a Linux installer for Dos-based games. It could even use the distros version of dosbox!
Steam and HIB deal with newer games. HIB requires developers to ensure cross platform compatibility.

GOG is taking old games and making them work on modern systems. I'd say that there is a difference between making a Win 95 game work on a modern Mac OS vs. telling a developer their game better work on LInux/Mac or else you're not selling it.

So, I'd say GOG announcing Mac support is a not so trivial.
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mondo84: You seem bitter or a little angry about something.
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bazilisek: Nah, I just really dislike marketing-speak. A simple "of course" would have done its job much better there.
Despite my previous posts, I actually agree with you on that. A simple "of course" _would_ have been better than that somewhat clumsy attempt of market-speak.

That said, I really can't hold that against them. GOG _is_ a very customer-friendly shop, and this message _should_ be transmitted in a promo show which presents an expansion to the service that is meant to attract new customers. Could it have done better? Sure. But it's not a big deal either. Guillaume did sound a bit awkward when he said that (he's not a professional in such presentations, is he?), I'm not even sure if it was planned.
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Psyringe: That said, I really can't hold that against them. GOG _is_ a very customer-friendly shop, and this message _should_ be transmitted in a promo show which presents an expansion to the service that is meant to attract new customers. Could it have done better? Sure. But it's not a big deal either. Guillaume did sound a bit awkward when he said that (he's not a professional in such presentations, is he?), I'm not even sure if it was planned.
Well, of course it's no big deal. It just rubbed me the wrong way. All in all, I was quite indifferent to the whole show.
Great news, thank you very much for that !
I for one can't wait more Mac users to come to this forum! It will be just like Brooklyn!
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mondo84: Steam and HIB deal with newer games. HIB requires developers to ensure cross platform compatibility. GOG is taking old games and making them work on modern systems. I'd say that there is a difference between making a Win 95 game work on a modern Mac OS vs. telling a developer their game better work on LInux/Mac or else you're not selling it. So, I'd say GOG announcing Mac support is a not so trivial.
Have to agree :)

I owned an Apple computer for literally 2 days a few years ago. Hated, hated, hated it.

Slow with the games that were incredibly fast on my PC, a laboriously long time to load any game, constant game crashes and freezes and on and on.

After 2 days, I put it up for sale on Craig's List and sold it at a $200 loss. Glad to get rid of the bloody awful thing. (Apple wouldn't take it back as, according to them, it had been 'customized' - read 'had more memory added to it', which Apple themselves did when I ordered it online;)

Needless to say, I have never bought an Apple product since, nor would I.

But, hey, good for Mac users being able to get their GOG fix. Just don't ever expect me to buy the P.O.S. computer :)
This particular Mac user has been a member of GOG for some time - I just had to use workarounds when I wanted to play a PC game. Which was horrible.

This turn of events is completely unexpected, and too fantastic for words!!