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I don't even remember when the last time was that I could run 5 miles :) That's about 8km right? But I think I could swim 1-2 without problems even now. Which reminds me that one of these days I should visit the swimming pools.
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nmillar: I quit smoking, then ran 5 miles in the Olympic Park 12 weeks later. I even managed to blog about it. :)

http://blog.runnersneed.com/2013/08/national-lottery-anniversary-run-queen-elizabeth-olympic-park-21st-july-2013/
Good job, man. Keep it up.

By the by, have you tried Vibram FiveFingers? I know that they look silly and cost a small fortune, but I really like running in them, and they're nice during trail riding as well (where clipless pedals might be too dangerous). It takes a good time to get accustomed to them, but I wouldn't trade them for any other running shoes.

EDIT: And just to compare times, my normal run is 4.25 kilometres (about 2.65 mi). I compensate for the short distance by tearing arsehole the whole way, rarely doing it in over 20 minutes in the winter and regularly clocking in eighteen and a half minutes in the summer, or under eighteen at the very best of occasions.
Post edited August 27, 2013 by AlKim
Meanwhile at my house, I sit on the couch with my laptop in my lap, the TV on and my treadmill sits in the corner unused with dust bunnies and cobwebs all over it. I bitch whenever I have to get up to get a refill of my beverage of choice and contemplate moving the fridge into my living room next to the couch.
After moving the fridge into my living room, I decide maybe that wasn't such a good idea as it is very noisy and I still have to get up to use the stove or microwave oven. So, I start to contemplate moving the fridge back into the kitchen, but due too my extreme laziness I just decide it's better to turn the TV up a little louder to drown out the incessant noise of the fridge.
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jjsimp:
This
I've never bothered with exercise in my life as I'm one those people who are allergic to physical work but now I'm starting to think I should get something because of the health benefits and better sleep. The problem is I'm not interested in a gym, I would prefer to invest in some kind of training set that is simple yet I can use it to move as train muscles in my body so using that on a daily basis I don't have to do anything else.

Anyone got any tips?
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Nirth: I've never bothered with exercise in my life as I'm one those people who are allergic to physical work but now I'm starting to think I should get something because of the health benefits and better sleep. The problem is I'm not interested in a gym, I would prefer to invest in some kind of training set that is simple yet I can use it to move as train muscles in my body so using that on a daily basis I don't have to do anything else.

Anyone got any tips?
Get a punching bag.
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Nirth: I've never bothered with exercise in my life as I'm one those people who are allergic to physical work but now I'm starting to think I should get something because of the health benefits and better sleep. The problem is I'm not interested in a gym, I would prefer to invest in some kind of training set that is simple yet I can use it to move as train muscles in my body so using that on a daily basis I don't have to do anything else.

Anyone got any tips?
Don't do it, It's a trap!

I would start with an exercise bike. They are usually cheaper, and it's one of those things that most people have no problem getting motivated to use. Then work your way up to the more expensive, motivation sapping treadmill. I seriously do have a treadmill and I dread using it. It actually does sit in a corner unused. If I had an exercise bike, I know I would use it and eventually I would start to use the treadmill. It's in a backlog of future purchases, way down the list and constantly being knocked down a peg, but it's there.
Post edited August 27, 2013 by jjsimp
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jjsimp: I would start with an exercise bike.
I just checked how much those cost, and I would seriously consider buying a non-stationary bike for the prices I've seen, provided you're willing to cope with winter conditions (nothing that a 1000-euro mountain bike won't handle) and to invest either time or money on maintenance.
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AlKim: I just checked how much those cost, and I would seriously consider buying a non-stationary bike for the prices I've seen, provided you're willing to cope with winter conditions (nothing that a 1000-euro mountain bike won't handle) and to invest either time or money on maintenance.
Yeah, but then you have to put up with the unbearable heat, cancer rays and other nasties of outdoors. Plus, I am less likely to exercise if I have an excuse, and weather is my biggest excuse maker. Besides you can get a stationary for $100-200USD, how is that a lot of money.
And in the US there's always craig's list, to get a discount off of someone else's failed exercise routine.
Post edited August 27, 2013 by jjsimp
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jjsimp: Don't do it, It's a trap!

I would start with an exercise bike. They are usually cheaper, and it's one of those things that most people have no problem getting motivated to use. Then work your way up to the more expensive, motivation sapping treadmill. I seriously do have a treadmill and I dread using it. It actually does sit in a corner unused. If I had an exercise bike, I know I would use it and eventually I would start to use the treadmill. It's in a backlog of future purchases, way down the list and constantly being knocked down a peg, but it's there.
But how effective is an exercise bike? I mean, I only train the muscles in my legs right? I actually have one but I rarely use it.

Those sticks with balls on that you hold and they sort of train you without you doing anything, do those work? It might be something for me.
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nmillar: I quit smoking, then ran 5 miles in the Olympic Park 12 weeks later. I even managed to blog about it. :)

http://blog.runnersneed.com/2013/08/national-lottery-anniversary-run-queen-elizabeth-olympic-park-21st-july-2013/
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AlKim: Good job, man. Keep it up.

By the by, have you tried Vibram FiveFingers? I know that they look silly and cost a small fortune, but I really like running in them, and they're nice during trail riding as well (where clipless pedals might be too dangerous). It takes a good time to get accustomed to them, but I wouldn't trade them for any other running shoes.

EDIT: And just to compare times, my normal run is 4.25 kilometres (about 2.65 mi). I compensate for the short distance by tearing arsehole the whole way, rarely doing it in over 20 minutes in the winter and regularly clocking in eighteen and a half minutes in the summer, or under eighteen at the very best of occasions.
They're not that expensive. True they are more expensive than you would expect, but compared to the cost of shoes that runners often buy, they're a really good deal. Plus, they last a really long time. So, I generally wait until they go on sale and buy a pair, knowing that I won't need to use them for a few months or a year. ( I do limit the number I buy, so I only have 2 at the present, I might buy a third, but that would be it until they wear out.

For those that don't like the look, there's always moccasins and similar. You get most, if not all of the benefits, but in a shape that people are less likely to gawk at.
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Nirth: But how effective is an exercise bike? I mean, I only train the muscles in my legs right? I actually have one but I rarely use it.

Those sticks with balls on that you hold and they sort of train you without you doing anything, do those work? It might be something for me.
Depends what your goal is. Exercise bikes are nice in that you can control the resistance, which makes them brilliant for strengthening the heart and balancing out the work you do running.

I personally wouldn't waste my money on a stationary bike, but a trainer that takes a real bike is potentially a good deal. And great on days where you need to exercise, but it's too rainy to go outside.
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blotunga: I'm pissed that I've injured my knee and can't do any serious leg workout :(.
That's what shoulder stand squats are for. They place only a very small amount of weight on the legs while developing the correct motion. From there you can usually move on to some sort of assisted squat that will help increase the strength of the leg.

Also, a fact most people don't know is that the calves go past the knees, which means that doing simple heal ups can help stabilize the knees and with minimal impact on the legs.
Post edited August 27, 2013 by hedwards
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hedwards:
I haven't injured myself at training. I think after 6 years I train pretty well and with correct form :). I was at a concert and jumped up and down a lot. And my knee had problems before (I've turned it round at basketball about 10 years ago and it was operated again around 3 yrs ago). And now it still hurts a bit when I extend it.
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Nirth: But how effective is an exercise bike? I mean, I only train the muscles in my legs right? I actually have one but I rarely use it.

Those sticks with balls on that you hold and they sort of train you without you doing anything, do those work? It might be something for me.
True, I thought you were just starting out, from a slothful, couch potato existence like me. I have to build to the truly torture exercises and devices, no insanity work out for me.

By stick with balls on, are you referring to free weights or kettlebells, or is there some other new torture device out there?
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AlKim: I just checked how much those cost, and I would seriously consider buying a non-stationary bike for the prices I've seen, provided you're willing to cope with winter conditions (nothing that a 1000-euro mountain bike won't handle) and to invest either time or money on maintenance.
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jjsimp: Yeah, but then you have to put up with the unbearable heat, cancer rays and other nasties of outdoors. Plus, I am less likely to exercise if I have an excuse, and weather is my biggest excuse maker. Besides you can get a stationary for $100-200USD, how is that a lot of money.
And in the US there's always craig's list, to get a discount off of someone else's failed exercise routine.
Okay, I made a completely uneducated guess that those 100-euro models would either be crap to begin with or would quickly become crap because you can't add enough resistance or something. Mind you, I haven't ever ridden such a device nor do I plan to do so in the near future, so what the hell do I know.

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AlKim: By the by, have you tried Vibram FiveFingers? I know that they look silly and cost a small fortune, but I really like running in them, and they're nice during trail riding as well (where clipless pedals might be too dangerous). It takes a good time to get accustomed to them, but I wouldn't trade them for any other running shoes.
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hedwards: They're not that expensive. True they are more expensive than you would expect, but compared to the cost of shoes that runners often buy, they're a really good deal. Plus, they last a really long time. So, I generally wait until they go on sale and buy a pair, knowing that I won't need to use them for a few months or a year.
Fair enough, can't really argue with any of that.
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AlKim: Okay, I made a completely uneducated guess that those 100-euro models would either be crap to begin with or would quickly become crap because you can't add enough resistance or something. Mind you, I haven't ever ridden such a device nor do I plan to do so in the near future, so what the hell do I know.
I have never tried them myself, but I know I do not need the top of the line or even middle of the road stationary. Seeing as you mention a $1300USD mountain biking and all that, stationary bikes are a thing for you only when the weather is totally shit. You probably would require one of the elite stationaries.
Post edited August 27, 2013 by jjsimp