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OneFiercePuppy: Getting the NN law changed would stop a lot of the Internet arguments, because few non-specialists understand the distinctions involved.
Their is no net neutrality law in Germany. Wikipedia has this definition:
Net neutrality (also network neutrality or Internet neutrality) is the principle that Internet service providers and governments should treat all data on the Internet equally, not discriminating or charging differentially by user, content, site, platform, application, type of attached equipment, and modes of communication.[1][2][3]

The Telekom is charging differentially by site and treats data not equally. Their mobile branch have a special agreement with spotify, which excludes Spotify traffic from the traffic counter...
1&1 and Vodafone have both stated that they have no similar plans to throttle net access:

https://twitter.com/1und1/status/326610296946970624

https://twitter.com/vodafone_medien/statuses/326643410389848064

Not sure how they plan to avoid this when both have their services running through Telekom's lines, but anyway. I don't know (m)any tech-aware people who actually get their net from Telekom. I haven't been with Telekom since 2005.
Post edited April 23, 2013 by jamyskis
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Robette: One of the articles contains THE neck beard.
LOL.. That picture maks me think.. Funny you mention this, i'm French with Germany a stone away, and one of my childhood friend, 35 old man with German and Polish origins, he has almost no mustache hair at all but only that neck beard collar growing like hell.. I swear, it must be a German thing!
Post edited April 23, 2013 by koima57
Not sure what the big deal is. Many other countries like US and here in back water of australia ISP's are going back to throttling once over limits even worse here 256k.
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nijuu: Not sure what the big deal is. Many other countries like US and here in back water of australia ISP's are going back to throttling once over limits even worse here 256k.
Well... That's the big deal.
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OneFiercePuppy: Getting the NN law changed would stop a lot of the Internet arguments, because few non-specialists understand the distinctions involved.
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Rincewind81: Their is no net neutrality law in Germany. Wikipedia has this definition:
That is irrelevant. There are EU directives that support it and supersede any local laws you might have .

That being said, the aforementioned directives received "patches" over the years and on of them is the Telecoms Package. The wikipedia page mentions that it was lobbied for hard by the telecoms and appears they got what they wanted.
Post edited April 23, 2013 by silviucc
In Poland, the only providers that limit bandwidth in any way are mobile ones. And they get their money in PLN, not euro. So please, don't bullshit me about bandwidth cost, if Polsih ISPs can afford it. And like 90% people here are pirates.

if you think paying 60 EUR/month (or equivalent) for 75GB/month is a fair game, you "know nothing, Jon Snow".
Post edited April 23, 2013 by keeveek
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silviucc: There are EU directives that support it and supersede any local laws you might have .
No there aren't.
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keeveek: In Poland, the only providers that limit bandwidth in any way are mobile ones. And they get their money in PLN, not euro. So please, don't bullshit me about bandwidth cost, if Polsih ISPs can afford it. And like 90% people here are pirates.

if you think paying 60 EUR/month (or equivalent) for 75GB/month is a fair game, you "know nothing, Jon Snow".
On the other hand, limits in the area of several hundreds of gigabytes don't sound that unreasonable

edit: spelling *shrugs*
Post edited April 23, 2013 by Fenixp
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OneFiercePuppy: Nope. You're wrong, but you're in good company. You're disregarding the inter vs intra network differences. It's an important distinction.

Please don't think that because I'm from the USA I must be ignorant of German interpretations of law. I assume Gunter Kneips university paper (now a little long in the tooth but easy to read) is still fairly accurate regarding German law on the matter? I skimmed pages 4 and 5 to refresh my memory. You might do so as well.
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DukeNukemForever: I know Günter Knieps work, but I have to disagree here. Offering your own services without a limitation but heavily limiting others is privileging your own data. Technically you can maybe distinguish between internet and intranet, of course, but for the customers it's relevant what services and data they can access through their last mile, and here telekoms own network services, labeled as intranet, are still another internet services.
And this is why I say you are in good company. Your intuitive understanding makes sense, whereas the actual implementation often does not. If the laws were changed to make intuitive sense, though, I fear there could never be much real neutrality. Or, if there were, plans would all have to be pay-per-data-volume, which would benefit me, for example, but likely not many other users.

That or allow all telecom infrastructure worldwide to be state-controlled and maintained so that a tarriff approaching zero could be implemented with infrastructure costs recouped through taxes, but that too may be impossible.
T-Mobile do the same thing over here too, limiting both traffic and speeds for no damn reason... why no damn reason? Because if local small ISPs can provide 16mbps without any limits at all (really, no limits at all for 10 EUR / month), so can the big nation-wide ISP whose packets cost double.
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Fenixp: On the other hand, limits in the area of several hundreds of gigabites don't sound that unreasonable
With videogames being around 25+GB lately, with HD VOD, music streaming and whatever, I wouldn't be so sure...
Especially if you have more than 2 users of your home network.
Post edited April 23, 2013 by keeveek
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keeveek: In Poland, the only providers that limit bandwidth in any way are mobile ones. And they get their money in PLN, not euro. So please, don't bullshit me about bandwidth cost, if Polsih ISPs can afford it. And like 90% people here are pirates.

if you think paying 60 EUR/month (or equivalent) for 75GB/month is a fair game, you "know nothing, Jon Snow".
Aside from the fact that Poland has a broadband penetration rate of less than 20% as against Germany's 78%?
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jamyskis: Now, I have no love for T-Kom - they are absurdly expensive and their customer support sucks beyond belief, not to mention that they have abused their monopoly on countless occasions - but you do need to remember that T-Kom's infrastructure carries not only its own traffic but that of the providers that lease its copper lines.

I've said for years that something had to give. Now it is.
One of the problems is that T-kom refused to invest into a better infrastructure for many, many years now. (there was an interesting article about that in the SPIEGEL this year but it wasn't released online.) So more and more provider are putting in their own copper or even fibre optic wires (and T-kom often tries to stop them from doing that) which makes people switch to these providers which then causes T-kom to make less money,which means they have less money to finally start improving their net...
So at least part of the problem of "too much" net traffic is home-made by not investing in better infrastructure.
Post edited April 23, 2013 by Piranjade
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Fenixp: gigabites
Why did this make me think of giant hamburgers?