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Descent: Underground is about to be backed! Thanks to everyone who helped, and to anyone who didn't, there's still time! :)
Post edited April 10, 2015 by A_Future_Pilot
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IAmSinistar: Outward - The Adventurer Life Sim

An open world RPG with co-op and survival elements. To be released on PC and consoles.

From simulating the day-to-day lifestyle of living alone in a vast world filled with creatures of fantasy to retiring and passing on your knowledge and skills to your next of kin, Outward is about creating a complete adventuring experience. It's not just combat, it's not just survival, it's both and more.
The game seems interesting.
But I have to admit that the "co-op" and "console version" makes me uneasy.
Maybe I'm just being squeamish.

And their indecision concerning DRM also makes me think twice.
Post edited April 11, 2015 by karnak1
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IAmSinistar: Heard back on Outward - The Adventurer Life Sim:

Sorry, but I cannot confirm that a DRM-free version will be available.

Ah well.
Their many pricy unique in game items give me Shroud of the Avatar Deja Vu.
Little Devil Inside
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rodrolliv: I've always wondered what happens if a project gets funded by a narrow margin, 100% or slighty over, and a high-tier backer can't/won't pay when the campaign finishes. It's one thing to have say, a dozen users failing to pay 10 bucks each, and another to miss a few grands from one person alone.
I've backed a few projects where that has happened. Since the projects made their goal, they get to keep the rest of the money that was pledged. It is usually really bad news for the project creator, though, since they were figuring on having more money available to complete their project than they ended up getting. Kickstarter tries to reach out to the backer who pulled out. Depending on the circumstances, that person can be banned from Kickstarter forever.
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canyonaz: I've backed a few projects where that has happened. Since the projects made their goal, they get to keep the rest of the money that was pledged. It is usually really bad news for the project creator, though, since they were figuring on having more money available to complete their project than they ended up getting. Kickstarter tries to reach out to the backer who pulled out. Depending on the circumstances, that person can be banned from Kickstarter forever.
Normally, the money should be locked the moment you pledge. I don't know how kickstarter does things, but unless something like a chargeback is involved, you shouldn't be able to back out after the project has been funded.
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canyonaz: I've backed a few projects where that has happened. Since the projects made their goal, they get to keep the rest of the money that was pledged. It is usually really bad news for the project creator, though, since they were figuring on having more money available to complete their project than they ended up getting. Kickstarter tries to reach out to the backer who pulled out. Depending on the circumstances, that person can be banned from Kickstarter forever.
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P1na: Normally, the money should be locked the moment you pledge. I don't know how kickstarter does things, but unless something like a chargeback is involved, you shouldn't be able to back out after the project has been funded.
None of the pledges get charged until after the campaign ends - that is one of Kickstarter's marketing points. In this case, the large pledge doesn't go through when Kickstarter tries to charge it. Incorrect payment info given, expired card, not a high enough limit, or something similar happens and the backer doesn't fix it in the week they are given after the campaign ends to do so. For the really large failures, Kickstarter has waived their own rule and has given the backer even more time to find a solution, but it still hasn't worked. My impression is that the people who never respond to the communications from Kickstarter or who pledged the large amount and knew it wouldn't go through are the ones who get banned.
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canyonaz: None of the pledges get charged until after the campaign ends - that is one of Kickstarter's marketing points. In this case, the large pledge doesn't go through when Kickstarter tries to charge it. Incorrect payment info given, expired card, not a high enough limit, or something similar happens and the backer doesn't fix it in the week they are given after the campaign ends to do so. For the really large failures, Kickstarter has waived their own rule and has given the backer even more time to find a solution, but it still hasn't worked. My impression is that the people who never respond to the communications from Kickstarter or who pledged the large amount and knew it wouldn't go through are the ones who get banned.
There are methods to deal with that, where the payment has already been validated and authorized but it has not yet gone through. I should know, as I've implemented them at my job. Basically, the transaction gets validated with something like paypal and the site gets a key, that can be used to actually execute the transaction later on. Depending on bank and payment service, it could be that the funds are not frozen in advance so the bank account may not have enough money when you execute the payment, but normally this kind of things should not happen.
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canyonaz: None of the pledges get charged until after the campaign ends - that is one of Kickstarter's marketing points. In this case, the large pledge doesn't go through when Kickstarter tries to charge it. Incorrect payment info given, expired card, not a high enough limit, or something similar happens and the backer doesn't fix it in the week they are given after the campaign ends to do so. For the really large failures, Kickstarter has waived their own rule and has given the backer even more time to find a solution, but it still hasn't worked. My impression is that the people who never respond to the communications from Kickstarter or who pledged the large amount and knew it wouldn't go through are the ones who get banned.
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P1na: There are methods to deal with that, where the payment has already been validated and authorized but it has not yet gone through. I should know, as I've implemented them at my job. Basically, the transaction gets validated with something like paypal and the site gets a key, that can be used to actually execute the transaction later on. Depending on bank and payment service, it could be that the funds are not frozen in advance so the bank account may not have enough money when you execute the payment, but normally this kind of things should not happen.
Kickstarter intentionally doesn't do it like that. The funds aren't frozen in advance. I'm not solving the problem of campaigns not getting the money that was pledged to them. I was answering rodrolliv's question about what happens.
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canyonaz: Kickstarter intentionally doesn't do it like that. The funds aren't frozen in advance. I'm not solving the problem of campaigns not getting the money that was pledged to them. I was answering rodrolliv's question about what happens.
I'm just pointing out, if shit like that happens it's because Kickstarter is not taking the necessary measures. Which I honestly doubt. So, for this to happen, the person who doesn't want to pay should go to rather extreme measures (such as the chargeback). Either that or Kickstarter is incompetent.

But yeah, whatever.
Wildfire

"Manipulate fire to terrify enemies and slip through their grasp in this stealth platformer where everything burns!"
Project Sidologie - JARRE style Commodore 64 music remixes

Not a game, but a series of C64 game music covers in the style of Jean Michel Jarre.
It's a book, not a game, but given the success of the previous two books from the same author, they have all my trust.
The Bitmap Brothers: Universe
SONGBRINGER- Action Adventure RPG