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This is what I made...also going off of what you said ET3D,
Case
AZZA Armour Gaming Case - Blue
Case Lighting
None
iBUYPOWER Labs - Noise Reduction
None
iBUYPOWER Labs - Internal Expansion
None
Processor
Intel® Core™ i5-3350P Processor (4x 3.10GHz/6MB L3 Cache)
Processor Cooling
Liquid CPU Cooling System [Intel] - Standard 120mm Fan
Memory
4 GB [2 GB X2] DDR3-1600 Memory Module - Corsair or Major Brand
Video Card
AMD Radeon HD 7770 - 1GB Single Card
Video Card Brand
Major Brand Powered by AMD or NVIDIA
Motherboard
Gigabyte GA-B75M-D3H
Intel Smart Response Technology
None
Power Supply
500 Watt - Corsair CX500 V2
Primary Hard Drive
1 TB HARD DRIVE -- 32M Cache, 7200 RPM, 6.0Gb/s - Single Drive
Data Hard Drive
None
Optical Drive
24X Dual Format/Double Layer DVD±R/±RW + CD-R/RW Drive - Black
2nd Optical Drive
None
Flash Media Reader / Writer
None
Meter Display
None
Sound Card
3D Premium Surround Sound Onboard
Network Card
Onboard LAN Network (Gb or 10/100)
Operating System
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium + Office Starter 2010 (Includes basic versions of Word and Excel) 64-Bit
Total Price $693. With Skyrim still at ultra.

I cant put 8GB of Memory because I cant get a motherboard that holds that much only gives me two options.
Do I need to do anything with the Internal Expansion and Smart technology?

So this build of computer will be able to play to days games really well even The Witcher games?
Post edited April 22, 2013 by Pythro
I'm not sure WHAT kind of sofware assembled that for you, but I'm sorry, it is a clusterfuck.

Overpriced case with crummy built-in fans that won't fit the motherboard connectors.

Overpriced, underperforming CPU. 3350P is for low-power applications.

Liquid cooling on a low-power CPU. Unless you are overclocking a high-power CPU, there is no reason for anything but stock cooling.

Insufficient memory. Get 8GB, anything less wastes the 64-bitness of the operating system.

MicroATX motherboard, and a crummy cheap one at that. Get ATX if you want to do things like plug in more than one fan.



Go back to the other recommendations you have been given in this thread. They make that build look like an expensive doorstop.
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cjrgreen: There's no reason you can't use an nVidia GPU with an AMD CPU, or an AMD GPU with an Intel CPU. The bigger problem is that very few good nVidia GPUs or Intel CPUs are going to be available within your budget.

If you can build your own (you need to be able to wield a screwdriver, not much more than that), you could do something like (these are current prices at Newegg):

CPU: AMD A8 5600K $110
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-F2A85X-D3H $85
RAM: Crucial Ballistix Sport DDR3-1600 2x4GB $58
GPU: XFX FX-777A-ZNF4 HD 7770 1GB GDDR5 $110 less a $20 MIR
Disk: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB $90
DVD: LG GH24NS95 $18
PSU: Corsair CX430 430W $45 less a $10 MIR
Case: NZXT Gamma Classic Black $30
OS: Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit $100

That's everything that goes in the tower, for $646 less $30 in rebates. If you have a retail copy of Windows that you can transfer, you can save $100 of that. Something less than $200 more for monitor, speakers, keyboard, mouse and you're good to go.
Would there be a way to make this computer with those specs or close to it on this site? http://www.ibuypower.com/Store/AMD_FM2_A-Series_APU
Im still taking more recommendations. I have been on sites like iBUYPOWER and Cyberpower trying to build computers but I am never sure if I am making them right..and most of the time they become 800- dollars I mean if i have to pay that much fine.

Oh is AMD a bad graphics card? My two friends (who think they know it all when it comes to computers) say that AMD sucks.
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Pythro: Im still taking more recommendations. I have been on sites like iBUYPOWER and Cyberpower trying to build computers but I am never sure if I am making them right..and most of the time they become 800- dollars I mean if i have to pay that much fine.

Oh is AMD a bad graphics card? My two friends (who think they know it all when it comes to computers) say that AMD sucks.
Fanboys will say stupid things like that.

AMD and nVidia are extremely competitive. Both produce excellent graphics cards. If nVidia has a significant advantage, it is in the ability of their cards to run well in Linux setups. If AMD has a significant advantage, it is in entry-level and mid-range gaming cards, where nVidia has nothing of comparable performance.
So basically both cards work great.
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cjrgreen: Liquid cooling on a low-power CPU. Unless you are overclocking a high-power CPU, there is no reason for anything but stock cooling.
It's not liquid cooled. Next to liquid cooled it says Standard 120mm fan. (I think there is an option from the site he used to build that computer for the unnecessary liquid cooling).

Insufficient memory. Get 8GB, anything less wastes the 64-bitness of the operating system.
MicroATX motherboard, and a crummy cheap one at that. Get ATX if you want to do things like plug in more than one fan.
There is nothing wrong with a microATX board. And what exactly is wrong with the Gigabyte board he has selected. You can buy a 3pin to molex converter for the fan to run it off the power supply, which I would advise to do anyway.

I'm with you on saving money on the case. Unless you want to show off, a cheap case is all you need. Save money and upgrade the memory to 8GB. Stay away from the no name power supply companies. The Corsair power supply listed is a good, cheap power supply.

If you are looking for upgrade ability, the 1155 socket from intel will be a dead end in a year or two. The other current intel socket is a little pricey for you. However, the 1155 you build will still be more upgradeable than a Dell or HP box you buy from Worst Buy.

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cjrgreen: Fanboys will say stupid things like that.

AMD and nVidia are extremely competitive. Both produce excellent graphics cards. If nVidia has a significant advantage, it is in the ability of their cards to run well in Linux setups. If AMD has a significant advantage, it is in entry-level and mid-range gaming cards, where nVidia has nothing of comparable performance.
I agree 100%. I have mostly purchased nvidia cards, but have no problems purchasing AMD cards or even recommending them. You can look at some good graphics card charts from Tom's Hardware that will show you the bang for your buck on graphics cards. They also have one for CPUs.

http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/2012-vga-gpgpu/benchmarks,135.html
Post edited April 22, 2013 by jjsimp
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cjrgreen: Liquid cooling on a low-power CPU. Unless you are overclocking a high-power CPU, there is no reason for anything but stock cooling.
avatar
jjsimp: It's not liquid cooled. Next to liquid cooled it says Standard 120mm fan. (I think there is an option from the site he used to build that computer for the unnecessary liquid cooling).

Insufficient memory. Get 8GB, anything less wastes the 64-bitness of the operating system.
MicroATX motherboard, and a crummy cheap one at that. Get ATX if you want to do things like plug in more than one fan.
avatar
jjsimp: There is nothing wrong with a microATX board. And what exactly is wrong with the Gigabyte board he has selected. You can buy a 3pin to molex converter for the fan to run it off the power supply, which I would advise to do anyway.

I'm with you on saving money on the case. Unless you want to show off, a cheap case is all you need. Save money and upgrade the memory to 8GB. Stay away from the no name power supply companies. The Corsair power supply listed is a good, cheap power supply.

If you are looking for upgrade ability, the 1155 socket from intel will be a dead end in a year or two. The other current intel socket is a little pricey for you. However, the 1155 you build will still be more upgradeable than a Dell or HP box you buy from Worst Buy.

avatar
cjrgreen: Fanboys will say stupid things like that.

AMD and nVidia are extremely competitive. Both produce excellent graphics cards. If nVidia has a significant advantage, it is in the ability of their cards to run well in Linux setups. If AMD has a significant advantage, it is in entry-level and mid-range gaming cards, where nVidia has nothing of comparable performance.
avatar
jjsimp: I agree 100%. I have mostly purchased nvidia cards, but have no problems purchasing AMD cards or even recommending them. You can look at some good graphics card charts from Tom's Hardware that will show you the bang for your buck on graphics cards. They also have one for CPUs.

http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/2012-vga-gpgpu/benchmarks,135.html
I'm sorry; I read "Liquid CPU Cooling System" and did not read far enough to realize that it is nothing more than a poor description of the stock cooler.

As for a MicroATX board, these have in general a single fan connector, lesser power handling components, and of course just 4 slots. There being no price advantage over comparable ATX boards, there is no reason to prefer one.

Those fans will not be 3-wire if they have Molex connectors. This means there will be no tachometer lead and no speed control; they will be always on full speed, even if you were to wire them into the motherboard, which would then be a little pointless.
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cjrgreen: As for a MicroATX board, these have in general a single fan connector, lesser power handling components, and of course just 4 slots. There being no price advantage over comparable ATX boards, there is no reason to prefer one.

Those fans will not be 3-wire if they have Molex connectors. This means there will be no tachometer lead and no speed control; they will be always on full speed, even if you were to wire them into the motherboard, which would then be a little pointless.
There are a lot of fans with thermal sensors or even a fan controller, there is really no reason you need the extra fan headers on the motherboard. There are also fan controllers, that can turn down even the molex fans, by reducing voltage to the fan. I only buy and install the quieter 120mm+ fans.
Four Memory slots are plenty....he is talking about running 6GB of RAM. You can get an 8gb stick for one slot, if the motherboard supports 8GB modules (not that I would only run one stick)
As for other reasons for the microATX, computer case size is the biggest reason for the microATX form factor.
jjsimp, I'm curious what build would you recommend? If you would please list the Specs of it. Just trying to get some ideas. I keep customizing computer on a sites like iBUYPOWER but it always ends up becoming like close to 800 dollars and over because of the OS.
I took another look at iBUYPOWER, and I noticed that the NZXT Source 210 is available there for the same price as the Azza. It's much better regarded, so would be a better choice.
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Pythro: jjsimp, I'm curious what build would you recommend? If you would please list the Specs of it. Just trying to get some ideas. I keep customizing computer on a sites like iBUYPOWER but it always ends up becoming like close to 800 dollars and over because of the OS.
To be honest, I would suggest purchasing a prebuilt system. Seeing as you are short on funds and I presume you know nobody that has put together a system before. $600-$700 is a little on the cheap side for a gaming PC. Your OS+graphics card alone would eat close to half of your budget. It can be done, but if you run into a problem with your build you will have to fork over a little money to troubleshoot the problem.
Now if you have some old parts laying around, the ideal solution would be to slowly upgrade. Do any of your friends have a spare graphics card you can use? A spare case+power supply? You said you have a spare hard drive. That will save you a little money, but hard drives are cheap currently, so you aren't saving very much.
That being said, stay away from the Dell, HPs and other mass produced PCs. Most of the mass produced PCs have custom motherboard layouts, which means you will have a hard time reusing the computer case and motherboard on your next upgrade. The motherboard layout is usually backwards from a DIY build.
Once you have a prebuilt system, save a little more money and want to upgrade. Go over to newegg.com and browse for some new computer parts.
I think it's worth saying that a Core i3 should not be the bottleneck for most games, the Radeon 7770 will, but even that will be enough for most games, especially if you don't use the highest settings. You will certainly be able to run The Witcher and Tera without problem. If you're not into first person shooters I think it will be good enough for your needs.

4GB is in my opinion a little too little. It's possible to use more than this these days just browsing the net. Though if you felt that your old laptop worked well enough in this regard it shouldn't be a huge problem.

It all boils down to how far you want to go, and to some extent how much you think you will want to upgrade in the future.

What kind of games do you plan to play? What will you do with the PC other than gaming?
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Pythro: jjsimp, I'm curious what build would you recommend? If you would please list the Specs of it. Just trying to get some ideas. I keep customizing computer on a sites like iBUYPOWER but it always ends up becoming like close to 800 dollars and over because of the OS.
avatar
jjsimp: To be honest, I would suggest purchasing a prebuilt system. Seeing as you are short on funds and I presume you know nobody that has put together a system before. $600-$700 is a little on the cheap side for a gaming PC. Your OS+graphics card alone would eat close to half of your budget. It can be done, but if you run into a problem with your build you will have to fork over a little money to troubleshoot the problem.
Now if you have some old parts laying around, the ideal solution would be to slowly upgrade. Do any of your friends have a spare graphics card you can use? A spare case+power supply? You said you have a spare hard drive. That will save you a little money, but hard drives are cheap currently, so you aren't saving very much.
That being said, stay away from the Dell, HPs and other mass produced PCs. Most of the mass produced PCs have custom motherboard layouts, which means you will have a hard time reusing the computer case and motherboard on your next upgrade. The motherboard layout is usually backwards from a DIY build.
Once you have a prebuilt system, save a little more money and want to upgrade. Go over to newegg.com and browse for some new computer parts.
Thanks for that info, no I don't think it was me who said I have a hard drive laying around. I have no computer parts laying around and have no friends that know how to put computers together (im ridding solo on this). Right now I have an ASUS laptop but im not sure if ASUS makes Desktop gaming computer?
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Pythro: Thanks for that info, no I don't think it was me who said I have a hard drive laying around. I have no computer parts laying around and have no friends that know how to put computers together (im ridding solo on this). Right now I have an ASUS laptop but im not sure if ASUS makes Desktop gaming computer?
Not sure if they have desktops or not, but they make motherboards, videocards, and monitors. I used to build most of my computers with Asus motherboards. They are a little on the pricey side, or they were. Sometime after the switch from AMD to intel processors I started running Gigabyte boards.