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You might be better off with something simpler and more robust in that price bracket. Buying a mouse that looks the part by an unknown (by me at least) manufacturer does raise some serious concerns about how robust it is.

I've tried to get the best of both worlds in the past and get something cheap that has a lot of features and it consistently bit me in the arse. So I just make the necessary investment, or stick with the simpler alternatives now.

One option might be refurbished stuff. But again there is the issue of lifespan.
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Huzzey5: For me I find the high DPI of gaming mice to be annoying more than helpful.
What does that mean? I know what DPI means, but I don't know how high-DPI mice feel different from low-DPI mice.

I don't even know if I've ever used a high-DPI mouse. All the ones I've ever bought home have been the cheaper ones, like 2x Logitech M325 today, 9.90€ wireless mouse (using one now).

Then again, I wouldn't be surprised that some of the mice I've gotten from work are some pricier high-end mice (because they came with some high-priced corporate laptop), but I can't really tell whether they feel different compared to my cheapo mice. The only thing that usually catches my attention is how the scroll wheel feels, e.g. in some mice it is quite coarse and loud, while e.g. in these M325s it is very nice, silent and smooth. The scroll-wheel even has inertia in M325, a bit like a trackball does!

And as I revealed, for some reason I don't seem to break mice down that often either, cheap or expensive.


EDIT: This Logitech M325 feels a bit odd... different to what I'm used to with my other mice. I wonder if it is that "mouse acceleration" that I sometimes keep hearing? It definitely feels like sometimes I lose track of the mouse pointer as it has suddenly travelled much faster than I thought the flick of my hand should move it.

But then maybe it is just a matter of learning it, because in theory it sounds good that it can be both precise and fast at the same time.
Post edited February 24, 2013 by timppu
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timppu:
I have a wireless mouse that can switch between 500 DPI and 1000 DPI. The higher the DPI the more the mouse pointer moves when you move the actual mouse. 1000 DPI means when you move your mouse an inch the pointer moves a whole 1000 pixels, about half of my widescreen. Its possible to get used to but I hate how twitchy it is. You jerk your hand a bit and the mouse is on the other side of the screen, so I keep it at 500, even that feels a bit high though.
It also occurred to me... One reason I might see myself pay more for a mouse is because some higher-end Logitech mice have been advertised to work also on surfaces where a common mouse fails, e.g. glass tables and varnished surfaces. Logitech apparently calls it "Darkfield Laser Tracking", included in e.g. "Performance Mouse MX" and "Anywhere Mouse MX" from Logitech. They cost 90€ and 70€ here, respectively.

I actually have one white computer table where at least some of my mice seem to fail, the pointer just doesn't move? So with that table I have to use a mouse mat. It is odd though because the same mice seem to work fine on pretty much any other kind of surfaces, also a darker varnished table, or even a pillow or my own lap.
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timppu:
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Huzzey5: I have a wireless mouse that can switch between 500 DPI and 1000 DPI. The higher the DPI the more the mouse pointer moves when you move the actual mouse. 1000 DPI means when you move your mouse an inch the pointer moves a whole 1000 pixels, about half of my widescreen. Its possible to get used to but I hate how twitchy it is. You jerk your hand a bit and the mouse is on the other side of the screen, so I keep it at 500, even that feels a bit high though.
Hmmm, can't that "mouse speed" be changed simple in Windows mouse settings in Control Panel, or even ingame (while gaming)? I thought the DPI would mean how accurate the tracking is, not really related to mouse speed.
Post edited February 24, 2013 by timppu
To look at it another way, Gazoinks, take the words 'cheap', 'wireless' and 'gaming' and pick the two most important to you.
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Navagon: To look at it another way, Gazoinks, take the words 'cheap', 'wireless' and 'gaming' and pick the two most important to you.
lol, that wast literally the post I was coming in here to make.
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timppu: Hmmm, can't that "mouse speed" be changed simple in Windows mouse settings in Control Panel, or even ingame (while gaming)? I thought the DPI would mean how accurate the tracking is, not really related to mouse speed.
Generally that's labled as "Mouse Sensitivity" in game, to the rate of motion compaired to actual user motion. You can find the same thing in console titles as "Joystick sensitivity", but it's more often used for shooters. Most of the time it's better to leave on default though since it's the only way to make quick turns (In a console game, the turn speed has limits, where as PC titles sometimes is only limited by how fast you move, essentially meaning your shotgun has just been used to clothsline your 10 best friends and a stray dog in about half a second).