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It's getting frustrating seeing good games get the dick because they don't max performance on a $600 graphics card.
Or because the general plot is more "He-Man" than "Do Robots Dream of Electric Sheep."

Yeah, I'm talking about the recent resurfacing getting done to Dino Beatdown.

It's pretty much the one game I'm spending the most time in right now and I also have BLands 2, BF3, Warfighter installed.

Developers are offering free copies for "Let's Play" YouTubers.

http://steamcommunity.com/app/104900/discussions/0/828935673216916999/

Obviously I don't want to see anyone lying that the game was 'great' when they too feel it was awful but I would like to see more older (and not as wealthy) reviewers checking out games like D Horde who were raised to love games more for the enjoyment (even if it's "Laughing the whole way through a B-Rate Movie" enjoyment) than focusing on the fact that the game doesn't surpass Black Ops II in production quality.

We're talking about an INDIE developer.
I do believe that a lot of hate it receives is because the game started off as a fairly blatantly dishonest way to get sales of a patched game going (the previous game got poor reception due to technical issues, they got fixed, previous game disappeared from Steam catalogue, and a new game with the name of dino beatdown or whatever appeared)
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Fenixp: I do believe that a lot of hate it receives is because the game started off as a fairly blatantly dishonest way to get sales of a patched game going (the previous game got poor reception due to technical issues, they got fixed, previous game disappeared from Steam catalogue, and a new game with the name of dino beatdown or whatever appeared)
Yeah, they did pull a cheeky marketing ploy but if it hadn't been for them doing so I might not have given the game the second chance that I did.

I'm pretty sure that if anyone didn't bother to read the game's description and tried to purchase a second copy there, Steam would've notified them that they already owned the game in check out.

So their principle and presentation was that of a used car salesman but the updates (plus the fact that people are actually playing the game online now) was definitely worth give a second chance too.

If you watch the Biscuit coverage he was a bit frustrated that the developers were still considering the game as 'Beta' but that only suggested to me that the developers are still willing to iron out the last few bugs and perhaps even add more content.
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carnival73: ...
Actually, he was frustrated that the game says nowhere on the gamepage that it's a beta
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carnival73: ...
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Fenixp: Actually, he was frustrated that the game says nowhere on the gamepage that it's a beta
Yeah, once again wish-washy presentation of the part of the developer.

A more tactful approach has been previously implemented by other indie developers as suggesting "Future continued updates and more content" as a bulleted feature in the game's description but never claiming their Steam release as anything less than the intended final product (especially as a cheeky surprise after purchase).
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Maybe they just need to hire a good field marketer.

A lot of what has tripped this up is superficial and involves poor social tact when aside from the way the game was marketed the end product is functionally enjoyable with plenty of room to grow.

I mean the developers' in-game real-money hat store is another example of how the developers' tend to accidentally put their ass forward before everyone gets a chance to look at their face.