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500 games on GOG.com ready to download and play.

Enter the GOG.com 500 Games Giveaway here!

We started more than four years ago with a collection of good old games and a crazy dream of games with no DRM. Many people thought that this could never work, but thanks to you guys we proved the nay-sayers wrong. The Good Old Games were a tremendous success and today GOG.com is proud to be a large and thriving alternative to other digital retailers. We're a place for gamers to get high-quality DRM-free games with free goodies and for publishers and developers to offer their precious digital creations to millions of dedicated gamers worldwide. We've released some of the best games in history over the last four years, and we're committed to keeping the bar high for games on GOG: the next 500 games on we release will be just as good as the ones we already have. For now, take a moment and enjoy Leisure Suit Larry--a great example of the classics that got us here, or you can pre-order Omerta: City of Gangsters--a promising Mafia crime sim that's showcases the quality & variety of the kinds of games that GOG.com will continue to release (new and old!) in the future.

We owe all of this to you--our gaming audience--and we're extremely grateful. This is as much your achievement as it is ours and that's why we're giving away 500 games to thank you. To enter the giveaway, simply tell us, after clicking the link, what's the next big step for GOG.com. Should we land on Mars? Create a small DRM-free country on some lonely Pacific island? Create an evil A.I. that will threaten mankind with endless tests? Just type a few words for a chance to win one of 500 games. You can get some extra entries by sharing, tweeting, and following us on social media. You're not joining any mailing lists or signing up for anything. We just need your e-mail to send the game. The giveaway ends next Thursday at 10:59 AM GMT. Join it here: GOG.com 500 Giveaway

Thanks again, and see you at a thousand games!
Missed the email link. Got my one in. I dont twit tweet or face . Why do they expect everyone to do that? TY
7/8 due to (permanently) lack of FB. Don't know if the twitter thins is working correctly because I twitted one day and the next I had 6/8, so pasting the URL once again raise it to 7/8 again.
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Daehawk: I and Im sure MANY others would appreciate it if you would not leave those of us who refuse to use FaceBook out of being able to enter contests. Before there was FB there were simple ways to enter a contest. At least supply alternate ways to enter. It makes those of us who refuse to use a social site feel as though we don't matter even if we have purchased numerous games from you. It's a slap in the face. It's smells of being illegal as if you are discriminating towards those without FB access.
Well, to be free of Facebook and Twitter is a reward in itself.
A blessing in.. disguise as you experience here.
I agree with what you say though.

Ha, people even distrust me because i don't use those media.


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Luned: I don't use Twitter and have abandoned even limited use of FB, yet I had no problems getting 5 entries. They've provided numerous entry methods, go read the text wall on the entry link.
Cool reply to that post. Thanks for the info
Post edited January 22, 2013 by begoggled
Another suggestion, instead of just re-releasing good old games, GOG should get their paws on the source code to recompile games, that would get the following advantages:

1) 100% compatibility with newer versions of windows (and x64 versions that would perform about 30% faster).
2) The possibility of using the source code of the windows 9x version of some games instead of using the DOS port executable.
3) The possibility of updating some game engines to widescreen and the latest version of DirectX and/or OpenGL.
4) The possibility to port to windows many console only games.
5) The possibility of native ports for OSX, iOS, Android and/or Ubuntu

I know this would require an extra effort, but many people would no doubt shell a few extra bucks to get the improved version (even if you already own the game).

i.e. Classics like Tales of the Unknown: The Bards Tale would no doubt become instant hits if ported to iOS/Android.

IMO the obvious target would be getting the source code of games using the Unreal Engine.
Post edited January 22, 2013 by mangamuscle
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mangamuscle: Another suggestion, instead of just re-releasing good old games, GOG should get their paws on the source code to recompile games, that would get the following advantages:

1) 100% compatibility with newer versions of windows (and x64 versions that would perform about 30% faster).
2) The possibility of using the source code of the windows 9x version of some games instead of using the DOS port executable.
3) The possibility of updating some game engines to widescreen and the latest version of DirectX and/or OpenGL.
4) The possibility to port to windows many console only games.
5) The possibility of native ports for OSX, iOS, Android and/or Ubuntu

I know this would require an extra effort, but many people would no doubt shell a few extra bucks to get the improved version (even if you already own the game).

i.e. Classics like Tales of the Unknown: The Bards Tale would no doubt become instant hits if ported to iOS/Android.

IMO the obvious target would be getting the source code of games using the Unreal Engine.
Ignoring for now the fact that quite a large number of source codes is no longer available, having access to the source and being able to do 1, 3, 4 and 5 are two different things. Believe me, we've been trying to get some of those in JA2 for quite a while, only thing we've managed to "hack" in is widescreen and there was some work been done on native ports. But that source code is available since 2003 (I think), and widescreen was added only last year.

So while I do wish for source codes when possible, I'd rather have them release the source code as is and not mess with them, since it does need a shitload of time to get anything done with the code, time better spent elsewhere.
Just wish GOG continue to add more good old games.
I know that if they stick with what they know then they can only be successful.
I hope we will soon see a game from the LucasArts catalog.

Or, since THQ is in big trouble, they could ad their older titles to GOG's library (aka Darksiders 1, Saints Row series, Warhammer 40k series and so on).

And I would also like to see more Apogee games (Hocus Pocus, Baron Baldric etc.)
Post edited January 22, 2013 by opeter
Entered. Congrats on the 500 games, GOG team. :)

Obvious answer is obvious, I'll never forget it: GOG needs to get DRM-free Pizza, worldwide.
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mangamuscle: Another suggestion, instead of just re-releasing good old games, GOG should get their paws on the source code to recompile games, that would get the following advantages:

1) 100% compatibility with newer versions of windows (and x64 versions that would perform about 30% faster).
2) The possibility of using the source code of the windows 9x version of some games instead of using the DOS port executable.
3) The possibility of updating some game engines to widescreen and the latest version of DirectX and/or OpenGL.
4) The possibility to port to windows many console only games.
5) The possibility of native ports for OSX, iOS, Android and/or Ubuntu

I know this would require an extra effort, but many people would no doubt shell a few extra bucks to get the improved version (even if you already own the game).

i.e. Classics like Tales of the Unknown: The Bards Tale would no doubt become instant hits if ported to iOS/Android.

IMO the obvious target would be getting the source code of games using the Unreal Engine.
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JMich: Ignoring for now the fact that quite a large number of source codes is no longer available, having access to the source and being able to do 1, 3, 4 and 5 are two different things. Believe me, we've been trying to get some of those in JA2 for quite a while, only thing we've managed to "hack" in is widescreen and there was some work been done on native ports. But that source code is available since 2003 (I think), and widescreen was added only last year.

So while I do wish for source codes when possible, I'd rather have them release the source code as is and not mess with them, since it does need a shitload of time to get anything done with the code, time better spent elsewhere.
I did not mean to say GOG should release the source code to the public (that would be nigh-impossible), I have no doubt their team of programmers can re-compile the source to get an up to date executable at the very least.
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MrLongPants: Ehhhhh, I thought DXHR was an ok prequel that had the spirit of the original but Hitman: Absolution on the other hand.....

I'd rather see them add Contracts and Blood Money.
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JCD-Bionicman: What do you find wrong with Absolution? As said, haven't played it. Was going to boycott it completely until I found out they re dubbed the game with Bateson's voice. Furthermore, the game is just as hardcore and open gameplay as previous games from what I've heard.

With HR, yeah I completely agree it's not as great as people make it. What didn't go wrong here?:
Nobody likes extremely scripted bosses that are selectively vulnerable and invulnerable, especially without an adequate plot reason. The boss battles in DE 1 were straight and to the point, which worked well enough even if sometimes they were a bit anticlimactic.
They shoehorned 3rd person into a game that didn't need it, and whose fanbase never asked for it.
The melee system. In other tactical shooters where melee is often a highly miscellaneous option, where using it is challenging but rewarding to pull off, DE HR's melee system completely breaks immersion and gameplay simultaneously.
I agree a lot with you on DXHR (don't forget the magic candybars lol).

I was actually planning on boycotting Hitman Absolution over Bateson too. I didn't and went into the game fully expecting to hear someone doing a Timothy Olyphant impersonation so I was so glad when I saw David Bateson in the credits. I figure that had something to do with the crapstorm they stirred up by planning to not have him in it.

To be honest i'm not the best at putting my thoughts on a game into words so long after playing it. I didn't think it was a terrible game just that as a sequel it should have built more on the strengths of the earlier games and aim to make something more like the previous installments. It seemed like a game that if you're new to Hitman you'll enjoy a lot more, very much like Splinter Cell: Conviction. However saying that there's a lot of people claiming to be fans of the series saying this is their favourite so what do I know, you might like it.

I would suggest reading the PC gamer review, I found myself agreeing a lot more with that then the reviews saying it was "The sequel Blood Money fans have been waiting for".
http://www.pcgamer.com/review/hitman-absolution-review/.
Post edited January 23, 2013 by MrLongPants
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mangamuscle: I did not mean to say GOG should release the source code to the public (that would be nigh-impossible),
Why nigh-impossible? If they have access to the source code, they can request permission to distribute it as well, since a source code without the assets is useless, thus you still need the original game to be able to play it. Plus, since we are talking about a DRM-free release, there shouldn't be any trouble with the bypassing DRM thing, kind of like JA2 1.12 code (only the calls to Laserlok function are still there, the functions themselves have been removed).

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mangamuscle: I have no doubt their team of programmers can re-compile the source to get an up to date executable at the very least.
I have tried doing that with a couple of codes, ended up spending 2 days to be able to compile a simple .c file as a 32bit executable, and only managed it thanks to another programmer. While I have no doubt that the coders at GOG are much better than me, I still think that widescreen support, for example, would take too much time for too little game.

It is though quite possible that I am gravely mistaken, but so far all the older codes I have seen have hacked their way to awesomeness, by calling functions and routines in ways that are no longer support, just so they could squeeze that extra something out of the machine.

So, while I would love to have source codes available (Wishlist 1, Wishlist 2), I'd rather they didn't do anything more than necessary to get the executables to run
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JCD-Bionicman: What do you find wrong with Absolution? As said, haven't played it. Was going to boycott it completely until I found out they re dubbed the game with Bateson's voice. Furthermore, the game is just as hardcore and open gameplay as previous games from what I've heard.

With HR, yeah I completely agree it's not as great as people make it. What didn't go wrong here?:
Nobody likes extremely scripted bosses that are selectively vulnerable and invulnerable, especially without an adequate plot reason. The boss battles in DE 1 were straight and to the point, which worked well enough even if sometimes they were a bit anticlimactic.
They shoehorned 3rd person into a game that didn't need it, and whose fanbase never asked for it.
The melee system. In other tactical shooters where melee is often a highly miscellaneous option, where using it is challenging but rewarding to pull off, DE HR's melee system completely breaks immersion and gameplay simultaneously.
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MrLongPants: I agree a lot with you on DXHR (don't forget the magic candybars lol).

I was actually planning on boycotting Hitman Absolution over Bateson too. I didn't and went into the game fully expecting to hear someone doing a Timothy Olyphant impersonation so I was so glad when I saw David Bateson in the credits. I figure that had something to do with the crapstorm they stirred up by planning to not have him in it.

To be honest i'm not the best at putting my thoughts on a game into words so long after playing it. I didn't think it was a terrible game just that as a sequel it should have built more on the strengths of the earlier games and aim to make something more like the previous installments. It seemed like a game that if you're new to Hitman you'll enjoy a lot more, very much like Splinter Cell: Conviction. However saying that there's a lot of people claiming to be fans of the series saying this is their favourite so what do I know, you might like it.

I would suggest reading the PC gamer review, I found myself agreeing a lot more with that then the reviews saying it was "The sequel Blood Money fans have been waiting for".
[url=]
The link just leads back to this page.

And actually I don't have anything against the "magic candybars," as they were just as prevalent in DE.
Post edited January 23, 2013 by JCD-Bionicman
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JMich: Why nigh-impossible? If they have access to the source code, they can request permission to distribute it as well, since a source code without the assets is useless, thus you still need the original game to be able to play it. Plus, since we are talking about a DRM-free release, there shouldn't be any trouble with the bypassing DRM thing, kind of like JA2 1.12 code (only the calls to Laserlok function are still there, the functions themselves have been removed).
I understand what you are saying, but remember that most company executives (the ones that insist in using DRM) are the ones that do not allow source for their games to be released ever, they rather have it lost and forgotten :(

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JMich: So, while I would love to have source codes available (Wishlist 1, Wishlist 2), I'd rather they didn't do anything more than necessary to get the executables to run
I rather them try and surprise us with what they can achieve :D Not to mention it would give them a unique advantage since no other company offers recompiled executables for good old games.
I own already 22% of the GOG Catalog by today's numbers. I was astonished when I realized that.
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dyscode: I own already 22% of the GOG Catalog by today's numbers. I was astonished when I realized that.
I'm at 54% (273 out of 502). I've learned to accept that there are some of these that I will never finish. ;)