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Can't remember, i was 2, or barely 3. Probably Fred or Frogger on the C64.
Really hard to say, but the first game on my own computer was Sokoban which i have still great memorys of - followed by Prince of Persia.

Ahhh those were the days....20MB of Disk Space and i had to choose either i install Windows or X-Wing ;)
That fiddling around with bootdisks just to run games. And that awesome Norton Commander.
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Gandos: Anyway, back when my parents bought the first computer I ever used (we actually had a Commodore years before that, but I was very little at the time and I only recall watching my brothers play games on it), I borrowed a PC game from a friend of mine which I already saw at his house. It was called Croc: Legend of the Gobbos.

Today, the game wouldn't be considered anything special; it's a typical 3D platformer with all the inherent problems games of that genre suffer from. But as a kid, I still managed to draw some enjoyment from it.
I really love that game, it still has a special place in my heart. I also have Croc 2 retail, but I've never actually installed it (yet).

The intro of Croc is super-sweet. I remember a one-year old toddler (of our relatives) loved to watch the intro when they visited us, and she seemed to understand the end of the intro was sad, as she would always burst crying at the end of it (when the king of Gobbos was captured by the big meanie). Awwww!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=piOHZI8s1S4
Post edited March 23, 2013 by timppu
Hmm, not sure. My first ever game was probably something like Pac-Man, or an early NES game like Legend of Zelda or Bubble Bobble.

First PC game was likely King's Quest.
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X3R022: Inspired by tinyE's comment on a different thread.

The first game I ever played was a very simple game called Red Baron. It was two dimensional and almost pointless, but my brothers and I still had tons of fun playing it.

EDIT: Actually the game was called Sopwith. My mistake. :D
My god, I wondered what that side-scrolling shooter was called. I assumed it was "Red Baron" as well. Long time ago. That was one of my first as well. The A.I. planes would always do the same moves, and always go on the same suicide missions against your base.

There were many ancient IBM PC-XT games I played as a small child. Moon Bugs was one I remember playing a lot of, as well as "infotainment" titles from Scholastic Software like Agent USA (which did teach me U.S. state capitals and major cities) and another one, Journey to the North Pole.

And one other early 80s IBM PC game that I can't for the life of me remember the title of, but I played a ton of, took place in a "Mad Max" styled post-apocalyptic wasteland. You controlled a fighter plane and your job on each world-map stage was to destroy all of they enemy motorcycles, planes, and trucks. Each successive level there were more and more of them and more numerous. You'd run up flush against one on the world-map and then go to a "combat map" that showed your attitude on the top map and altitude on the bottom. Trucks were always a bitch because you could only destroy them with a shot in the tires and you ran the risk of crashing into a hill when trying to do so. I remember on the world-map that you had certain refueling depots (I think) and clusters of enemy planes had a tendency to camp out on them so you were forced to fight them if you needed to revisit 'em. Damn, I wish I knew what that game was.
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MaridAudran: My god, I wondered what that side-scrolling shooter was called. I assumed it was "Red Baron" as well. Long time ago. That was one of my first as well. The A.I. planes would always do the same moves, and always go on the same suicide missions against your base.

There were many ancient IBM PC-XT games I played as a small child. Moon Bugs was one I remember playing a lot of, as well as "infotainment" titles from Scholastic Software like Agent USA (which did teach me U.S. state capitals and major cities) and another one, Journey to the North Pole.

And one other early 80s IBM PC game that I can't for the life of me remember the title of, but I played a ton of, took place in a "Mad Max" styled post-apocalyptic wasteland. You controlled a fighter plane and your job on each world-map stage was to destroy all of they enemy motorcycles, planes, and trucks. Each successive level there were more and more of them and more numerous. You'd run up flush against one on the world-map and then go to a "combat map" that showed your attitude on the top map and altitude on the bottom. Trucks were always a bitch because you could only destroy them with a shot in the tires and you ran the risk of crashing into a hill when trying to do so. I remember on the world-map that you had certain refueling depots (I think) and clusters of enemy planes had a tendency to camp out on them so you were forced to fight them if you needed to revisit 'em. Damn, I wish I knew what that game was.
Glad I could help. :D

I know the exact game you're talking about and unfortunately I can't remember what that is called either. It was another game my brothers and I would play around the same time.
An unkown Atari 2600 game? Hell if I can remember. All I recall is playing on one when my Dad brought it home for us kids to test it out. We happened to end up with a C64 instead... thank god!
Post edited March 23, 2013 by mistermumbles
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X3R022: I know the exact game you're talking about and unfortunately I can't remember what that is called either. It was another game my brothers and I would play around the same time.
Yes, it was terribly addicting and I think rather sophisticated for the time and level of technology. Each world-map stage had some "edgy" name to it. And another detail just came back to me: They weren't refueling depots, but a slow-moving zeppelin that would follow you around that often attracted attention from those enemy planes on the world-map. It was annoying because the planes were just spammy obstacles and you needed to focus on the motorcycles and trucks to advance.
First game I can remember playing was Rambo: First Blood II on the C64 when I was 4 years old. My dad and I used to take turns playing it.

I had a go playing it again recently for the first time in 25 years - how on earth did I manage to play these games as a kid? Games were totally unforgiving in that era, but then many could be completed in under an hour so they needed to challenge you. I think Rambo could be done in 10 minutes or so, but I'm pretty sure I never did (got to the gunship at the end many, many times, but never survived it).

There were around 5 of us with C64s and I know one guy completed it once (or so he said). He was, momentarily, a god.
Super Mario Bros.

I was raised by grandparents who had no idea about such things but I spent a Summer in California with my mom and she got me a NES. I was pretty blown away, and she and I played Mario for hours that first night.

My first PC game was Space Quest III, on my mom's computer another Summer. I didn't really get into PC gaming until King's Quest VI and Doom though.
Probably this along with this pacman clone and the original Prince of Persia
I can't recall the EXACT game, but it would have been a game on the Atari 2600. Could have been Bowling, or Pinball, or ET or Indiana Jones or Megamania or Adventure or... I really don't recall, lol.
The first game I played was Ladder.

Something like that: http://ostermiller.org/ladder/
Breakout
Probably Pong. Yes, back when it came out.